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catchpole
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 11:03 am    Post subject: Hangs on boot up - Panic +0x7d/0x168 [SOLVED] Reply with quote

My system already has Mint 13 xfce and lubuntu
The hdd has three partitions:
sda1 = Lubuntu
sda3 = Mint (Default option)
sda4 = New install of Gentoo

I have just installed Gentoo to sda4.
After installing Grub2 in Gentoo but not activating it, I realized that I just needed to update the existing Grub.
Grub customizer was already installed in Mint 13 xfce. So I used that to update Grub.
(Gentoo was already listed in Grub Customizer but not in the start up splash screen)

When I re-booted and selected Gentoo from the list, the computer just hung.
I see one of the lines says Panic.
Quote:
[ 1.1552040] [<[c17548f8>] Panic +0x7d/0x168

It carries on from there for twelve more lines and stops at:
Quote:
[ 1.552040] Kernel Offset: 0x0 from 0xc1000000 (relocation range: 0xc00000000xf7ffdfff)

I'm left with a horizontal flashing cursor and nothing works. I'll just have to switch off.

I couldn't copy and paste the output because of the "hang".

Any suggestions anyone?
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Last edited by catchpole on Fri Dec 26, 2014 8:42 am; edited 1 time in total
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BradN
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did you configure your kernel by hand or use genkernel?

On my last desktop install, I tried by hand and apparently missed some important option so I redid it from genkernel and then customized with much better results.

I think copying more error text before that panic may help too.
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steveL
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 11:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Show us the grub.cfg|conf that is booting Gentoo, and the content of /etc/fstab in the Gentoo partition.
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catchpole
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 6:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi BradN,

I configured the kernel by hand.

The output on the screen on bootup flashes by and off the screen so I can only see what's at the end.
I can't copy and paste because of the hang. all I can do is write down what I see and type in into another computer.

Hi SteveL,

The Gentoo /etc/fstab
Quote:
# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# noatime turns off atimes for increased performance (atimes normally aren't
# needed); notail increases performance of ReiserFS (at the expense of storage
# efficiency). It's safe to drop the noatime options if you want and to
# switch between notail / tail freely.
#
# The root filesystem should have a pass number of either 0 or 1.
# All other filesystems should have a pass number of 0 or greater than 1.
#
# See the manpage fstab(5) for more information.
#

# <fs> <mountpoint> <type> <opts> <dump/pass>

# NOTE: If your BOOT partition is ReiserFS, add the notail option to opts.
/dev/BOOT /boot ext2 noauto,noatime 1 2
/dev/ROOT / ext3 noatime 0 1


I can't find "grub.cfg". Is it in the Gentoo partition (sda4) or do I look in sda1
Do I have to activate it?
I didn't do:
Quote:
grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub.cfg

because I didn't want to mess with the existing booting operation.

I need more knowledge.
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 6:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can you see anything before kernel panic? A few lines before panic would provide the clues we need.
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catchpole
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Jaglover,

I'll type what I see on the screen:
Quote:
[1.552437] Hardware name: MICRO-STAR INTERNATIONAL CO. , LTD MS-7211/MS-7211 BIOS 6.00 PG 07/24/2006
[1.552553] 00000000 00000000 f6069eb4 c17583a9 f6069efc f6069ed4 c17548f8 18c41ec
[1.553002] c1ae5860 00000000 f6069efc 00008001 f58ed000 f6069f28 c1a2ae9e 18b7a18
[1.553086] f6069efc f6069efc fffffffa 00000000 fffffffa f6eafda0 c1a8a0e0 e6b6e75
[1.553086] Call Trace:
[1.553086] [<c17583a9>] dump_stack+0x41/0x52
[1.553086] panic+0x7d//0x168

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steveL
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 8:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

catchpole wrote:
The Gentoo /etc/fstab
Code:
/dev/BOOT               /boot           ext2            noauto,noatime  1 2
/dev/ROOT               /               ext3            noatime         0 1

That's wrong; /dev/ROOT should be /dev/sda4 and you don't have a /boot mounted from Gentoo afaict (it's a dir on the same partition, though unused.)
Quote:
I can't find "grub.cfg". Is it in the Gentoo partition (sda4) or do I look in sda1
Do I have to activate it?
I didn't do:
Quote:
grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub.cfg

because I didn't want to mess with the existing booting operation.

No, you were right: it would be in your sda1 (where your main OS boots from/uses as boot), but the above is what's wrong, if that's your fstab.

You could put that as /dev/sda1 /boot above, but use the noauto option if you do; that way you can mount it to copy over a new kernel and System.map for gentoo, but there's no danger of overwriting it in normal usage. (It's more important given that this is a secondary install.) And add the sync option while you're there.
OFC, don't do that if sda1 isn't a /boot partition, but is in fact the rootfs of your normal install.

You can also use PARTUUID for rootfs, which the kernel gets from the hard-disk (and is thus not the same as LABEL which requires the fs, afair.) That's not normally a problem with mobo chipset drivers built-in, since sda is always sda, ime, but if you get changing ids, that's the best option.
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

catchpole,

Can you post a photo of the panic?

As steveL says, your /etc/fstab is not correct but I doubt if root has been mounted, so /etc/fstab will not have been read.
On the good news front, that means switching off isn't going to harm any of your filesystems.
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catchpole
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Advocate,

My sda1 contains Lubuntu and it was the first operating system on the empty, newly formatted disc.
sda2 is an extended partition containing the Swap.
I then dual booted with Mint which is on sda3.
After that I used Gparted to make sda4 for the future installation of Gentoo.

Therefore I believe that the boot partition is in sda1.

I took a screen shot of Gparted but I don't know how to include it (or a photo) in this post.
The computer is not my main machine and I have the luxury of not being concerned about loosing everything on it.
Its a machine for learning about Linux.

I don't understand the "above" bit in:
Quote:
You could put that as /dev/sda1 /boot above, but use the noauto option if you do;


Does it mean that I replace the "/dev/BOOT" line in Gentoo fstab with:
Quote:
/dev/sda1 /boot noauto, noatime, sync 1 2

I'm not sure of the spacing between the separate parts.

Or does it mean that I do:
Quote:
grub2-mkconfig -o /dev/sda1 /boot noauto, sync


Also when you say:
Quote:
that way you can mount it to copy over a new kernel and System.map for gentoo


What would I be mounting and copying and to where?

Please forgive my lack of knowledge and understanding.
I don't have the big picture yet.

I need to read more about how the boot process works and in what logical order.


Hi NeddySeagoon,

You doubt that root has been mounted.
What do I need to do to find out if it has and if not how do I ensure that it is in future boots?

Thanks to all for being so patient.
I'm struggling at this point.
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 4:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

catchpole,

You cannot include an image in a post here but there are may free sites that will allow you to post a image file.
You then post a link to the image here so we gan all find it.

Booting, properly called bootstrapping after the Greek? god that pulled himself up to heaven by tugging on his own bootstraps, which is clearly impossible.
Computers cheat - there are several circular issues to be resolved to get your PC to start.
First, the BIOS can read exactly one logical block from the disk logical block 0. Even then the boot loader can only be 446 long.
Grub won't fit in 446 bytes, so all that is there is a loader to load a better loader.

Eventually, grub loads the kernel and optionally, the initrd and passes control to the still compressed kernel. Grub is done.
Now its the kernel and initrd alone in memery to continue the start up process.
We know you get at least this far, or you could not get a kernel panic.

The kernel decomresses itself, initialises itself and mounts the initrd (if any) as a temporary root firisystem.
root is not yet mounted, so the kernel cannot read /etc/fstab to find out where root is. There appears to be a chicken and egg problem here. Its resolved by the root= or real_root= on the kernel line. Root gets mounteh this way ant the kernel runs /sbin/init. /sbin/init starts everthing else.
A process called localmount reads /etc/fstab to know what to mount. rootfsck also uses /etc/fstab to know the filesystem type on root.

The stage3 puts the placeholders BOOT ROOT and SWAP in /etc/fstab. You are supposed to replace these with their partition names when you set up your Gentoo. As you missed this step, a few error messages are to be expected but not a kernel panic.

The panic image will be useful.
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catchpole
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2014 6:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi All,

I've just typed everything that's shown on the screen after the failed boot.
I just want to get it reported and saved before I do anything else!
Quote:
[1.552437] Hardware name: MICRO-STAR INTERNATIONAL CO. , LTD MS-7211/MS-7211 BIOS 6.00 PG 07/24/2006
[1.552553] 00000000 00000000 f6069eb4 c17583a9 f6069efc f6069ed4 c17548f8 18c41ec
[1.553002] c1ae5860 00000000 f6069efc 00008001 f58e1000 f6069f28 c1a2ae9e 18b7a18
[1.553086] f6069efc f6069efc fffffffa 00000000 fffffffa f6eafda0 c1a8a0e0 e6b6e75
[1.553086] Call Trace:
[1.553086] [<c17583a9>] dump_stack+0x41/0x52
[1.553086] [<c17548f8>] panic+0x7d//0x168
[1.556045] [<c1a2ae9e>] mount_block_root+0x147/0x1ca
[1.556045] [<c1753cbf>] ? create_dev+0x45/0x4c
[1.556045] [<c1a2affe>] mount_root+0xdd/0x101
[1.556045] [<c11110ce>] ? sys_unlink+0x10/0x12
[1.556045] [<c1a2b23a>] ? initrd_load+0x43/0x47
[1.556045] [<c1a2b141>] prepare_namespace+0x11f/0x163
[1.556045] [<c1a2ac0c>] kernel_init_freeable+0x1b5/0x1c2
[1.556045] [<c1a2a4cb>] ? do_early_param+0x7a/0x7a
[1.556045] [<c175186a>] kernel_init+0xb/0xce
[1.556045] [<c1765b37>] ret_from_kernel_thread+0x1b/0x28
[1.556045] [<c175185f>] ? rest_init+0x5f/0x5f
[1.556045] kernel Offset: 0x0 from 0xc1000000 (relocation range: 0xc00000000xf7ffdfff)

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2014 8:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

catchpole wrote:
My sda1 contains Lubuntu and it was the first operating system on the empty, newly formatted disc.
sda2 is an extended partition containing the Swap.
I then dual booted with Mint which is on sda3.
After that I used Gparted to make sda4 for the future installation of Gentoo.

Ok that's all good; if this were standard MBR, you'd likely make an extended partition in 4, and then several logical partitions inside that.
Don't worry about that for now, I'm just mentioning it for completeness.
Quote:
Therefore I believe that the boot partition is in sda1.

You don't have a boot partition: you have a /boot folder inside sda1 which is the rootfs for your main (Lubuntu) install.
Quote:
The computer is not my main machine and I have the luxury of not being concerned about loosing everything on it.
Its a machine for learning about Linux.

Ah that's good to know; you shouldn't need to reinstall Gentoo but if you wanted to use lvm for example, now would be a good time to set it up. It can also be sorted out later, if you just want to start playing (just keep backups.;)
Quote:
I don't understand the "above" bit in:
Quote:
You could put that as /dev/sda1 /boot above, but use the noauto option if you do;

Does it mean that I replace the "/dev/BOOT" line in Gentoo fstab with:
Quote:
/dev/sda1 /boot noauto, noatime, sync 1 2

I'm not sure of the spacing between the separate parts.

Yes it does; no spaces between comma-separated options (so it's all one chunk.) Although in your case, it's not a partition exclusively for /boot, so I'd use:
Code:
/dev/sda1 /mnt/lubuntu noauto,noatime,sync 0 0
(you don't want to dump/pass it from this system, since it's not under our control; though hardly anyone uses those fields anyway.)

You'll need to run mkdir /mnt/lubuntu first (inside the chroot) or
mkdir /mnt/gentoo/mnt/lubuntu if outside the chroot (once you have /dev/sda4 mounted at /mnt/gentoo)
Quote:
Quote:
that way you can mount it to copy over a new kernel and System.map for gentoo

What would I be mounting and copying and to where?

Typically one has a separated /boot partition which is only 128MB or so (some go lower, some higher.)

So usually we'd have sda1 as /boot which holds the grub.conf and kernels for the machine; then you mount that from your Gentoo install when you want to install a new kernel. The noauto option tells mount not to mount it automatically, during mount -a which is what happens at startup. Thus it's not available to read or write to during normal operation; this isn't an issue as the data in it is only read at system startup, and it means your kernel and other boot files cannot be overwritten most of the time (which is more secure, although realistically if something could write there, it can write anywhere on your install.)

The only gotcha is that you need to mount it (as root) before you install the kernel. If you forget, it doesn't break anything, since it just writes to your root partition's /boot dir; equally though it won't update your actual kernels as used by grub.

Some people use make install of their kernel, which uses vmlinuz and System.map as filenames, and moves the old one to .old. I prefer to install my kernel manually with:
Code:
cp arch/x86/boot/bzImage /boot/gentoo-3.X.y
cp System.map /boot/System.map-3.X.y-gentoo-gnu
where 3.X.y is the kernel version.
The System.map name has to match the output of uname -r when the kernel is running. I mention it because the *-gnu suffix is new. The vmlinux (bzImage) name doesn't matter, so long as grub knows about it.

note: this is after make && make modules_install has completed successfully.

Then I just copy an old stanza in /boot/grub/grub.conf (this machine is on legacy grub) and change the version; once it's running correctly I make it the default, and typically lose an old one/clean out its src dir etc.

In your case, you'd:
Code:
mount /mnt/lubuntu
cp arch/x86/boot/bzImage /mnt/lubuntu/boot/gentoo-3.X.y
cp System.map /mnt/lubuntu/boot/System.map-3.X.y-gentoo-gnu
nano -w /mnt/lubuntu/boot/grub.conf # for legacy grub
umount /mnt/lubuntu

Since you're using grub2 from lubuntu, you'd do the above skipping nano, reboot into lubuntu and sort out grub2 from there, afaict (since it's a lubuntu grub2.) I can't advise on that, as I don't use it. AIUI you should be able to just edit grub.cfg but that's not so advisable if you use the mkconfig or sth.

You could also mount /mnt/lubuntu readonly, and then remount it rw when it came time to install a new kernel. This would allow you to access files from there during normal usage (and ofc if you want you can mount it rw in normal usage without noauto, but that's on your head;) bad idea iow.)

One thing I'd definitely advise is a separate /home partition, if no other; it's not usually a good idea to share user accounts across distro (so separated homedirs, with different logins) but it's definitely the partition you care most about, and it is useful to at least be able to access files across distro. (a /home/share dir is useful if you need writeable sharing.)

I'd advise ext3, accessed via the ext4 module in kernel for /home, simply because the most important job of a fs is to reliably store your data. (man mke2fs)
Feel free to believe the hype about various experimental fs tho; btrfs is the new reiser3 ;)

I hate reading some poor newb who's lost all his or her files because everyone just said "yeah just use one big partition" and something's gone wrong on their machine, and the fs is trashed.

HTH,
steveL
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2014 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

catchpole,

After all that, it looks like the line I really wanted has scrolled off the screen. Still there is a big hint at
Code:
[1.556045] [<c1a2ae9e>] mount_block_root+0x147/0x1ca
that suggests the kernet failed to mount root.
Some popular reasons are, something is missing from your kernel or your boot loader config file points to the wrong place for root.

Get into your chroot,
Code:
emerge wgetpaste pciutils
now run the following commands.
Code:
wgetpaste /usr/src/linux/.config
lspci | wgetpaste
and post the URLs you get back.
Your bootloader config would be good te see to but I'm not sure where it is.

Each of your distros will have a directory called /boot but your system can only have a single boot loader.
Its probably in sda1/boot somewhere.

When you set up a system with multi boot in mind from the outset, it helps preserve your sanity if you create a single /boot partition that will hold all the files needed for booting for all your distros. It gets shared, like swap, this also means it fits in with the concept of a single boot loader and you choose what OS to load from the boot menu.
You haven't done it that way. The other ways work too, they are just harder to get your head around.

Next up, is the concept oy using the boot directory inside the first OS you install for all the boot files for everything. Thats much like the /boot partition above only /boot is mow on the root of your first install. That will be sda1 in your case. If you ever decide to wipe this distro out, you wipe out /boot for all your distros, which is a very bad thing.

Now it gets harder ...
Each distro comes with its own /boot directory, and will install its own boot loader if you let it. You must always use a single boot loader but you can put the files, other than the boot loader files, into each distros /boot.

There is another way. You can install each distros boot loader to the partition (not the HDD) its on except for the first disto installed, which gets installed to the HDD.
Now you chainload one of the secondary boot loaders from the first one. This method would give you two successive grub menus to load Gentoo, if you do this.

In one of your /boot/grub directories, you will have grub.conf or grub.cfg that loads Gentoo, thats the one we need. Again, wgetpaste is your friend.
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catchpole
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2014 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi SteveL,

I'm still reading through your post.
Meanwhile I'll reply to NeddySeagoon.


Hi NeddySeagoon,

The results:
Quote:
wgetpaste /usr/src/linux/.config
Your paste can be seen here: https://bpaste.net/show/cb324daecb68

Quote:
lspci | wgetpaste
Your paste can be seen here: https://bpaste.net/show/2090c31206eb

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2014 11:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

catchpole,

For mounting root we care about
Code:
00:0f.0 IDE interface: VIA Technologies, Inc. VIA VT6420 SATA RAID Controller (rev 80)
00:0f.1 IDE interface: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT82C586A/B/VT82C686/A/B/VT823x/A/C PIPC Bus Master IDE (rev 06)
since thats where all your HDD are attached.

Code:
# CONFIG_SATA_VIA is not set
# CONFIG_PATA_VIA is not set
unfortunately you have both of the low level drivers you need set to off in your kernel, so the kerel cannot see your hard drives at all.
Use make menuconfig to set those options to <*>, not <M>, rebuild and reinstall your kernet, then reboot to test.

Your partition and filesystem settings look good.

Hint: press / in make menuconfig
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catchpole
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2014 1:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi NeddySeagoon,

I got there after a bit of a struggle and I now have a working Gentoo system.
Something flashed by on the splash screen that said some local file system failed to load but I got the # prompt for root.
Did "shutdown -h now" and taking a rest.

I'm still reading through the post from SteveL.

I'll feel happier when I've got the GUI working. Its just a milestone along the way.
Lots to do before then and lots of reading. Doing is the best form of learning.

Thanks to everyone who've helped me to get this far.
No doubt I'll be back for more advice.
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2014 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

catchpole,

Build on what works, so when you do something and it breaks, you know what it is and can back it out whatever you did last

Check your logs for the error message from you boot and fix it, or at least, understand it before you move on.
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 17, 2014 7:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi NeddySecombe,

I found the problem of not loading local file system in the log:
Quote:
kernel: [2.273929] EXT3-fs (sda4): error: Couldn't support because of unsupported additional features (240)


It seems that you've helped on this problem before.
https://forums.gentoo.org/viewtopic-t-880149.html
It mounted the file system with ordered data mode. Opts: (null)

I saw some solutions at:
https://forums.gentoo.org/viewtopic-p-7259024.html

However I don't know which is the right solution for me.
Some people say "Ignore it" but I'd be happier if I fix it. (I've had many problems bounce back at me later on)
Sorry to pester you again!

Can you help?
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With experience of Mint and trying to learn more by intalling Gentoo
Motherboard = MS-7211- MICRO-STAR INTERNATIONAL CO., LTD
CPU = Intel(R) Celeron(R) CPU 2.80GHz version: 15.4.9
Memory = 2GB
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NeddySeagoon
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 17, 2014 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

catchpole,

The simple fix is to add rootfs=ext4 to your kernel line in the boot loader config fle.
Normaly, all the kernel knows is the location of root, not the filesystem type. The kernel therefore has to guess the type.
I know its in /etc/fstab but thats on / (root) and root is not yet mounted.

The rootfs= parameter tells the kernel the filesystem type for root so it no longer needs to guess.
Oh! ext4 is an example, don't use ext4 unless its right for you.

It is safe to ignore too.
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NeddySeagoon

Computer users fall into two groups:-
those that do backups
those that have never had a hard drive fail.
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