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philipW
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 5:24 pm    Post subject: triple boot Reply with quote

hi,
Im new to linux and someone betted me that i cant install gentoo so now i have to install it.
Dont worry im not gonna ask you guys to walk me trough the installation process.
So i have a laptop (msi gt72 6qd) with a dualboot with windows and antergos i also wanna install gentoo on it.
can i just make some space free on my hard drive and install gentoo widout grub and when im done boot into antergos to reconfigure grub to find gentoo?
someone told me gentoo doesnt like grubs that are already installed.
thanks in advance,

Philip


Last edited by philipW on Thu Apr 06, 2017 5:28 pm; edited 1 time in total
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cboldt
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 5:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can do what you want. If grub is already choosing between two boot options, it can easily choose between three (or more). Just don't allow any "automatic installer" to set up the boot options for you.
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philipW
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cboldt wrote:
You can do what you want. If grub is already choosing between two boot options, it can easily choose between three (or more). Just don't allow any "automatic installer" to set up the boot options for you.


Ah oke that answered my question
Thanks!
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cboldt
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 6:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Go for quadruple boot! I put SystemRescue CD on my hard drive. It can share partition space with Gentoo, or with your other Linux installation.

Sysrescue is Gentoo-based, and provides a good platform to install Gentoo from. I keep it (sysrcd) around in case I make a screwup of my Gentoo to the point that it won't start up.
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philipW
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cboldt wrote:
Go for quadruple boot! I put SystemRescue CD on my hard drive. It can share partition space with Gentoo, or with your other Linux installation.

Sysrescue is Gentoo-based, and provides a good platform to install Gentoo from. I keep it (sysrcd) around in case I make a screwup of my Gentoo to the point that it won't start up.


I have to look into that casue now you are confusing me a bit but thanks for the tip quadrupple boot would be awsome and system rescue can come hany i guess.
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cboldt
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Installing sysrcd on a hard drive of a system that already has a boot-manager is pretty easy. It's easier than installing Gentoo, that's for sure.

In a nutshell, without cookie-cutter instructions:

Choose the partition that will hold sysrcd
Make a directory at the "root" of that partition, called "sysrcd"
That is, if the partition is normally mounted at /home, make /home/sysrcd
If the partition is normally mounted as /, make /sysrcd
If the partition is normally mounted as /usr, make /usr/sysrcd
Copy a kernel, the initramfs, the ".dat" file, the version file, and the checksum file to that directory
Tell your bootloader where to find the pertinent sysrcd files, and do whatever the bootloader requires to make those changes effective.

To copy the few files that make up sysrcd, I mount systemrescuecd-x86-[version].iso rather than boot from it.

The advantages to putting the rescue on the hard drive are that it is much faster loading than from a CD or a thumb drive, and it is always handy. The disadvantage is that if the hard drive fails, you've lost "it." I don't worry about the disadvantage, because it is easy enough to put a copy of sysrcd on a CD, if needed to back up a system lost to hardware failure.
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NeddySeagoon
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

philipW,

You can boot as many distros as you have room for on your HDD.
If that's not enough, you can net boot some more too.

If you do a bit of planning before you install the first one, life is easier.

Since you may have at most one boot loader per HDD, chain loading is not counted, having a single separate boot partition for all your installs makes life easy.
You share this /boot with all your installs and they all install their kernels and initrd files there.
This keeps the boot loader configuration file simple.

Most users add extra distros as an afterthought, so the single shared boot doesn't happen.

This gives you two choices. Which is the least worst is up to you.
You can chainload one boot loader from another. The is a one time manual configuration in the boot loader loaded by the BIOS.
Add an entry to the next bootloader. The Windows entry does this.
The down side is going through at least two menus to start anything that is chainloaded.

The alternative is to manually add entries to alternate operating systems to your single boot loader configuration.
The downside is that you have to edit these every time you update the kernel.

grub2 users can probably edit its black magic to auto detect everything but I'm not a grub2 user.

I use grub-legacy to boot 3 or 4 different Gentoo installs with the shared /boot single boot loader approach.
_________________
Regards,

NeddySeagoon

Computer users fall into two groups:-
those that do backups
those that have never had a hard drive fail.
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philipW
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 07, 2017 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NeddySeagoon wrote:
philipW,

You can boot as many distros as you have room for on your HDD.
If that's not enough, you can net boot some more too.

If you do a bit of planning before you install the first one, life is easier.

Since you may have at most one boot loader per HDD, chain loading is not counted, having a single separate boot partition for all your installs makes life easy.
You share this /boot with all your installs and they all install their kernels and initrd files there.
This keeps the boot loader configuration file simple.

Most users add extra distros as an afterthought, so the single shared boot doesn't happen.

This gives you two choices. Which is the least worst is up to you.
You can chainload one boot loader from another. The is a one time manual configuration in the boot loader loaded by the BIOS.
Add an entry to the next bootloader. The Windows entry does this.
The down side is going through at least two menus to start anything that is chainloaded.

The alternative is to manually add entries to alternate operating systems to your single boot loader configuration.
The downside is that you have to edit these every time you update the kernel.

grub2 users can probably edit its black magic to auto detect everything but I'm not a grub2 user.

I use grub-legacy to boot 3 or 4 different Gentoo installs with the shared /boot single boot loader approach.


I think i use grub 2 black magic cause when i installed antergos i couldnt detect windows but when i reloaded grub my windows showed up at the boot menu.
Before i installed antergos i used arch anywhere to install arch but it couldnt detect windows so everytime i wanted to switch os i had to change the boot order in my bios witch i found really inconvenient but like cboldt said it might be because i used a script to install arch.
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philipW
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 07, 2017 7:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cboldt wrote:
Installing sysrcd on a hard drive of a system that already has a boot-manager is pretty easy. It's easier than installing Gentoo, that's for sure.

In a nutshell, without cookie-cutter instructions:

Choose the partition that will hold sysrcd
Make a directory at the "root" of that partition, called "sysrcd"
That is, if the partition is normally mounted at /home, make /home/sysrcd
If the partition is normally mounted as /, make /sysrcd
If the partition is normally mounted as /usr, make /usr/sysrcd
Copy a kernel, the initramfs, the ".dat" file, the version file, and the checksum file to that directory
Tell your bootloader where to find the pertinent sysrcd files, and do whatever the bootloader requires to make those changes effective.

To copy the few files that make up sysrcd, I mount systemrescuecd-x86-[version].iso rather than boot from it.

The advantages to putting the rescue on the hard drive are that it is much faster loading than from a CD or a thumb drive, and it is always handy. The disadvantage is that if the hard drive fails, you've lost "it." I don't worry about the disadvantage, because it is easy enough to put a copy of sysrcd on a CD, if needed to back up a system lost to hardware failure.


I will give installing gentoo+sysrcd a try tommorow when i have enough time.
I will let you guys know how it goes.
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