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AngryEasternFrog
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 7:36 pm    Post subject: No booting after following official guide and re(eee)boot. Reply with quote

Hi,
this will be one of those long posts, because im an angry frog.
I have been trying to install a linux distro, but since some *ekhem* (a starting) distros pissed me off with those snobish guides I decided to give gentoo a try.
The guide is overally nice, explains a lot. I have learned about the specific tools, files, config procedures, that's nice. Aside to that, I found it not to mention of " dosfstools ", which was required for me to make a fat32 partition for /boot (the guide mentioned ext2? I believe that later it mentioned fat32, anyway, I read that uefi /boot needs fat32, so I turned it into one).

I have read the guide, made partitions, 2MiB free for that Grub bootloader, then 128MiB for /boot and swap on another disk and /home at my ssd (the last partition, because im dualbooting with windows 10).
I have set that up, mounted the catalogs /mnt and /boot, then downloaded the whole set of applications (the sources codes and it got compiled) after choosing plasma version of the system.
To the point. I then compiled kernel and the last point in the guide is to set up the bootloader.

First: I had arch installed previously (after getting pissed off a lot), but because some f libraries didnt work, I decided that going into some specific libraries won't help me much and this distro looks like way better described. I am kinda a noob. I previously had Manjaro and liked it, but it had nothing to do on it. I wanted to try out something more than that or ubuntu (I dont really like it too much).
So, I followed the specific steps.

My 128MiB in vfat (called fat32 in fstab, I editted it manually because at first it was ext4 and I didn't know what commands stand for updating fstab lel) was mounted to /boot (and yes, a few weeks ago I had no idea what chroot was for (thank you the guide lel) so I did all of those compilations after chrooting (forgot the command at this moment), everything was mounted like /mnt and /boot, I can give ls of boot if anyone wants)
Then:


Code:

    root #echo 'GRUB_PLATFORMS="efi-64"' >> /etc/portage/make.conf
    root #emerge --ask sys-boot/grub:2
    root #grub-install --target=x86_64-efi --efi-directory=/boot
    root #grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg

(yes, it did return me the info that there were detected images on the disk, and that there were no errors in the process)

I accidently typed just grub-mkconfig before the last one, but it showed me some sort of instructions on the screen. I applied the last command later because it saves the config in the /boot I believe.
After that I rebooted and the screen welcomed me with "no bootable devices".

Why is that? I personally hate grub, because it always makes issues to me. I also compilled kernel using genkernel so I don't think that I messed up something in there.

Notes: I have one old bios entry (I don't really know how to use efibootmgr to remove entries or add them) from old arch (disabled from booting) installation AND a new entry of "grub".
Choosing grub I get the previous communicate. I have spent 11 hours wondering about this installation process (yeah, I have some time, I treat it like fun and simply some sort of studying process).
Anyway, there is no point in me removing everything to compile those programs and kernel for the next 2-3 hours (that's more or less what it took me to download and build it eh).



Any ideas? Again, im just a noob learning on my own. I don't really desire answers like:
"get rekt peep, gtfo to ubuntu", because I would f use ubuntu if I wanted to and what I install is my damn concern (just mentioning it, because some people know better than I what to damn learn about).


PS: I have two bootloaders, because angry gopniks like me don't damn want to be like everyone, and if I mess up any linux installation process (especially bootloaders) then I can easily boot up my windows install and return to the second one later. In this case I planned on testing out Gentoo with later adding an entry in the bootloader (it is possible). I simply would risk less and sacriface whole 128 MiB of space (not a lot).
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AngryEasternFrog,

Welcome to Gentoo.

Not booting doesn't give us a lot to go on. We need to understand where it goes wrong.

When all is well, you will see a grub menu, choose the menu entry to boot, grub will load the kernel and eventually, /sbin/init will run and put lots of of text on the screen taht ill end with the login prompt.
Where in that sequence of events does it fail?

Two bootloaders installed on the same HDD will drive you insane, as will two (or more) boot partitions on the same HDD.
Yes, it can be made to work. One bootloader per HDD, so, you can boot one of several HDD is OK.

The correct fstab entry for fat32 is vfat, not fat32.
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 9:13 pm    Post subject: Re: No booting after following official guide and re(eee)boo Reply with quote

AngryEasternFrog wrote:
I found it not to mention of " dosfstools ", which was required for me to make a fat32 partition for /boot (the guide mentioned ext2? I believe that later it mentioned fat32, anyway, I read that uefi /boot needs fat32, so I turned it into one).


Yes, the handbook does mention, and instruct. to install dosftools if you are using UEFI.
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"When all is well, you will see a grub menu, choose the menu entry to boot, grub will load the kernel and eventually, /sbin/init will run and put lots of of text on the screen taht ill end with the login prompt.
Where in that sequence of events does it fail? "
Like I said.
The reboot leads to the screen, where after booting of "grub" from the uefi nothing appears beside "please select booting device" or something similar in meaning.
Basically a loop of that sentence, there is no grub with entries inside. Nothing is loading at all.

"Two bootloaders installed on the same HDD will drive you insane, as will two (or more) boot partitions on the same HDD.
Yes, it can be made to work. One bootloader per HDD, so, you can boot one of several HDD is OK. "

Why would they drive me insane? Could you explain this? Im genuinely curious.
The windows bootloader doesnt start on the 0 sector because it is the third partition on the disk. Even if GRUB was using the very first sectors for some reason (I have never studied it that far) then in theory it could be perfectly fine for the first one to work and the second one to be activated only from UEFI when needed. (I also did that once and had 2 bootloaders working, but since arch pissed me off with the mouse having 2 libraries, one not described a lot, and the second looking like a sorcerer book of ancient water-people from ooga booga land, I decided that it will benefit me more to install something else, rather than to study ancient code of weird origins)

"The correct fstab entry for fat32 is vfat, not fat32."
Understood. I thought that fat32 is the filesystem that is somehow modified into vfat. Vfat and fat32 are two separate types then, yes?
Should I then kick bootloader out and format the boot into vfat and re-write fstab to note vfat in there on /boot?

I could provide ls of /boot and fstab file, but I don't know if there is any option for saving logs from bash?
I can take pictures and upload it somewhere. If that will help then let me do that. (I saw people providing logs, but I have no idea how to do that really.


Yeah, it does mention those tools. I didn't notice it in there.
Beside that I find the guide really well made and explanatory, so don't hang me for that.
I actually find it way better than arch's wikipedia and it taught me more in terms of understanding the commands and some tools. It just was enjoyable to me.
(I heard the story of some "bad things" happening in the past, and I can only wonder how great that wiki could be before that...)
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

AngryEasternFrog,

Its not yet clear if you use BIOS or UEFI to boot.

With BIOS the boot loader starts at LBA 0. You don't get to change this. LBA 0 is the only block of a HDD that the BIOS can read.
That's a design feature. That means only one bootloader can be installed in LBA 0 per HDD. You can choose in the BIOS which HDD to boot from, so one bootloader per HDD works.
With two or more bootloaders, one bootloader starts in LBA 0 and can be used to load other bootloaders. If the real bootloader, starting in LBA 0 is damaged, the other bootloaders cannot be reached.
Its far simpler and more robust to use a single bootloader.

With UEFI, LBA 0 is not used. The bootloader is loaded by the UEFI firmware. The UEFI firmware itself can present a menu of things it can load. They can be anything in the correct format and saved on the vfat partition, since UEFI firmware can only read vfat. This means that grub must be in the vfat partition. Since the UEFI firmware can load anything in the right format from the vfat partition, you can have several bootloaders if you want to. Its not so fragile as BIOS.

From your last post, you see the UEFI menu, choose grub then get "please select booting device".
It follows that you are using UEFI, that UEFI loads grub, or at least, grub is in the right format, or it would not appear in the UEFI menu. Then it goes wrong.
I don't recall grub being so verbose in its early error messages. Exact error text would help.

Either grub is not correctly installed or grub is not compiled for your CPU and you are getting an illegal instruction exception which cannot be handled.
The latter would be likely to force a reset, not provoke the error message you report.

To get grub to run, you do not need a grub menu. If the menu is missing, you will get a GRUB> prompt.

How many efi directories do you have?
I don't know if UEFI firmware can deal with more that one.

Once upon a time, there was FAT12. It was just called FAT because that's all there was. Its still used on floppy disks of all sizes ever used on IBM PC clones
Along with the introduction of HDD, FAT16 was introduced. This was modified over the years as HDD got bigger but it reached its limit at 4G per partition.
This was fixed by the introduction of FAT32. In linux, the FAT filesystem driver is called vfat. It works with all versions of FAT.

Try reading
Code:
man mount
You will find fat and vfat listed but not the FAT variants. /etc/fstab is used to generate calls to mount, during the startup process.
The only time that the FAT variant matters matters to the user is at filesystem create time.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry for having had confused you.
Yes, my system that runs hardware on motherboard is UEFI and whole disk is using GPT partition with separate windows booloader somewhere in there.
The first sectors of the disk were reserved for my linux.

I think that I messed up entirely. I just don't understand how.
I checked twice the cataloges on my disk and entire /boot and /mnt are empty. Other catalogs are not.
I remember using the steps in the guide, I mounted /mnt/gentoo and /boot onto the partitions, then changed directory, chrooted and created those mounts like proc.
It was only after that when I installed the rest of packages and kernel and then a bootloader. Why it isnt there?

I might want to reinstall everything, but I dont understand why would at least /boot be not empty if it was mounted and the install command told it to install on /boot.
The command that I used was ls, it returned me no content in /mnt and /boot. I mounted those on my disk though.
Im quite a noob, but I think that mounting /mnt/gentoo and /boot on partitions that I used in the installation process and changing root using that guide's command to use /mnt/gentoo and its bash should grant me access to contents of those partitions?...

Is there any obvious error that I made?
I will remember about vfat though. I don't know if that could be the case for something messing up?

EDIT: Am I thinking right that having used
Code:
chroot /mnt/gentoo /bin/bash
I am changing my root into the mount point of /mnt/gentoo that I set on my partition of root as in the installation, right?
I basically see many issues here. I don't understand for example how ls /mnt (or ls mnt) can return me no content? Didn't the command literally change directory of root from the live cd to /mnt/gentoo?
boot is entirely empty to me I guess (checking with ls), the other catalogues look fine though. I have lib32, lib64, bin, I saw genkernel there too. I only don't know where the kernel is saved at?
I checked the /proc catalogue and I saw nothing. Why is that? Isn't proc for processor microcode or alike? I believe that in the installation process I saw files in there.

Should I give it a try and install grub again/other bootloader first?


Last edited by AngryEasternFrog on Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:52 am; edited 5 times in total
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

AngryEasternFrog,

Don't reinstall. Everything else will be good. It never fixes Gentoo anyway.
You just get the opportunity to make a different error. :)

Boot the install media.
Mount your partitions as you did following the handbook. There is no need to mount /proc, /sys or /dev

Do not chroot.
What do you have in your vfat partition. That might be /mnt/gentoo/boot but it doesn't have to be.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Having mounted /mnt/gentoo on my root and /boot on my boot.
I ls /mnt and see subdirectories like gentoo. I ls /mnt/gentoo and see root subdirectories (I believe), there is boot directory.
ls /mnt/gentoo/boot returns no content, like it was empty.

The bootloader isn't installed correctly?
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 10:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

AngryEasternFrog,

If your boot was not mounted correctly when you installed, the files would have been installed to the /boot directory on your root partition instead.
You have several different palaces called boot on your system and mixing them up is not an error. It won't work but Linux can't tell.

First there is your boot partition. You can see it in fdisk or whatever tool you used to partition your HDD.
Then there is the directory called /boot on your root filesystem.

When you install. the boot partition should be mounted on the /boot directory on the root partition. That makes the two places the same.

Lets check that.
Boot the install media mount your root partition at /mnt/gentoo.
What do you have in /mnt/gentoo/boot ?
This is with the boot partition not mounted.

The right answer is nothing because it should all have gone to the boot partition.
Now mount your boot partition at /mnt/gentoo/boot
What do you have in /mnt/gentoo/boot now?
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mount /dev/sda6 /mnt/gentoo
-> ls /mnt/gentoo : gave subdirectories
-> ls /mnt/gentoo/boot : gave no results

Boot on mnt/gentoo/boot is empty

mount /dev/sda2 (boot partition in vfat) /boot
-> ls /boot : gave folders/files:

EFI (at least something detected as EFI, some sort of file)
GRUB (something detected as grub)
and kernel in somewhere else.
This one looks alright to me?


Last edited by AngryEasternFrog on Sun Oct 07, 2018 1:01 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 12:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Despite your dislike of Ubuntu, I've found it's easier and quicker to install Ubuntu,
and then install Gentoo, that it is to install Gentoo from scratch.

Will
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AngryEasternFrog,

Quote:
mount /dev/sda6 /mnt/gentoo
-> ls /mnt/gentoo : gave subdirectories
-> ls /mnt/gentoo/boot : gave no results

Boot on mnt/gentoo/boot is empty

So far so good.

Quote:
mount /dev/sda2 (boot partition in vfat)
-> ls /boot : gave folders/files:


Maybe. Where did you mount /dev/sda2 ?
Code:
ls /boot
will show the boot media /boot.

Code:
mount /dev/sda6 /mnt/gentoo
mount /dev/sda2 /mnt/gentoo/boot
ls /mnt/gentoo/boot


ls /boot is different to ls /mnt/gentoo/boot.
/boot is the install media
/mnt/gentoo/boot is your install and will be your /boot
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

/dev/sda2 is a 128MiB partition of vfat mounted under /boot through mount /dev/sda2 /boot

I found there something with kernel in the name, and that's why I thought that those are the kernel and bootloader files?
Mounted under /boot (through the command above), ls is reading sda2 and gave me those three files as the result.


"ls /boot is different to ls /mnt/gentoo/boot. "
I have used both, the first one above gave me 0 results, the second one gave me three. (in here, the first one gave me three results, the second gave me none)
Do you mean that /boot is my install media before the
Code:
 mount /dev/sda2 /boot
command or afterwards as well?

Following that, if /boot is always the installation media, how do I check the /boot on the partition that was meant to be the booting sector with a bootloader?


Last edited by AngryEasternFrog on Sun Oct 07, 2018 1:02 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 1:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AngryEasternFrog,

Your install media has a whole filesystem tree of its own.
Boot it and run the command
Code:
mount

It will show its own filesystem tree, since your gentoo is not attached yet.

Now run
Code:
mount /dev/sda6 /mnt/gentoo

This will add your /dev/sda6 to the filesystem tree at /mnt/gentoo.
Code:
mount
will show this now.

When you do
Code:
mount /dev/sda2 /boot
you mount your /dev/sda2 over the top of the boot media /boot.
That's permitted. All of the files in the boot media /boot become hidden.
Its OK to see what you have in your boot but for correct chroot operation, you must do
Code:
mount /dev/sda2 /mnt/gentoo/boot

You can see your Gentoo filesystem tree growing with
Code:
mount


This is because the
Code:
chroot /mnt/gentoo /bin/bash
hides everything above and outside /mnt/gentoo, so your boot, mounted as
Code:
mount /dev/sda2 /boot
would not be accessible.

Which boot are you looking at, your own or the boot media?
Both should contain a kernel file.
If you use -l option to ls, it will show you file dates and times.
Your kernel date/time will be the newest of the two. It will certainly be dated after you started your install.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 1:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ls -l /boot told me something like
Code:
-> mnt/livecd/boot

this is the livecd's boot folder like you told previously I believe.


after mount /dev/sda2 as /mnt/gentoo/boot
ls -l told me 3 files (but this time, as you said, those were mounted in a totally different way, they were not attached under the media's boot, but under the gentoo's partition, am I understanding it properly?)

18:53 EFI: Sytem.map-genkernel
19:06 GRUB initramfs-genkernel
18:53 kernel-genkernel.

This is what I got from ls -l /mnt/gentoo/boot after mounting /dev/sda2 as such (sda2 being vfat 128MiB).


Also, thank you for some explanation, it helped me a little bit.
Looks like previously I mounted /dev/sda2 as simply /boot and ran the installation.
It might be that those files were installed onto /boot but the boot isn't at /mnt/gentoo, am I thinking right?
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AngryEasternFrog,

Quote:
It might be that those files were installed onto /boot but the boot isn't at /mnt/gentoo, am I thinking right?

That was my concern too, which is why I wanted to be certain which boot we were looking at.


Quote:
after mount /dev/sda2 as /mnt/gentoo/boot

initramfs-genkernel and kernel-genkernel are in the right place.
Sytem.map-genkernel is a debug file and not used for booting.

This confirms that for the install, your /dev/sda2 was correctly mounted at /mnt/gentoo/boot.

Further, it confirms that your issue is grub install related, so there is no point is reinstalling all of Gentoo.

You also list EFI: and GRUB there.
I would expect GRUB to appear as a directory but named grub in lower case.

Can you post the entire output of
Code:
fdisk -l
please.
The Gentoo boot media contains a program called wgetpaste, so
Code:
wgetpaste -c 'fdisk -l'
will run the command and put the output on the web, then give you a link.
Post the link so we can read it.

https://paste.pound-python.org/show/a8vzvNzZN2VyUMimm0gM/ is mine, by way of an example.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://paste.pound-python.org/show/ZMQNazwMGrSPkiYAov5J/
Wait a second, going to reboot, because I made a typo at the second one.

fdisk -l :
https://paste.pound-python.org/show/8EJPYYxqWgIXzhxGVic8/

sda1 - guide's free partition for grub
sda2 - grub's /boot
sda3 - windows bootloader (chosen from UEFI if I want to)
sda4 - some microsoft trash that I was afraid to remove and wouldn't give me much space back anyway
sda5 - windows 10
sda6 - root

sdb - storage disk

sdc1 - linux home
sdc2 - windows 'home'
sdc3 - swap for linux

sdd1 - I believe that it is the live usb

sde1 - some random usb that I formatted to fat, because windows wouldn't detect it so Linux did...

PS: That's a really great program, thank you for mentioning it. I was looking for something similar at first.
PS2: That "pobrane" folder isn't really a big deal ... I was trying to figure out how to copy URL using Links and later the guide mentioned that I need to download it into a folder instead of copying url into that command. So I at first tried to copy url (and failed) and then found a mirror and simply downloaded it into the root directory. Pobrane was an idea for saving an url into file and then reading it into a bash program, but I didn't need it in the end though.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AngryEasternFrog,

It all looks good ... it just doesn't work.

Point out the section of the handbook you followed to build and install grub please.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Handbook:AMD64/Full/Installation#Default:_GRUB2
I followed the whole guide from A to Z, unless I made a mistake somewhere. I skipped optional parts beside one I believe.

First: "root #echo 'GRUB_PLATFORMS="efi-64"' >> /etc/portage/make.conf"

The second: "root #emerge --ask sys-boot/grub:2"

The third: "root #grub-install --target=x86_64-efi --efi-directory=/boot"

The fourth: "root #grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg"

I believe that I used only those four.

There were no errors, everything went like in the guide. Rebooted and it failed.
I believe that I did mount /dev/sda2 only as a /boot, but perhaps genkernel or grub did their own magic that I am not aware of though.

I think that one thing is worth mentioning though. I did read the guide at that point, but it also suggested that leaving noauto and no(something) flags on /boot is safe and faster.
One would disable automount, the second would disable some sort of algorithm thus speeding it up. I had it suggested for /boot as it was flagged with parted I believe.
Does this change anything? I thought that auto /boot mounting was meaning that once started up the system would automaticly mount /dev/sda2 at /mnt/gentoo/boot, grub should know what partition to boot from I believe?...
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AngryEasternFrog,

We know that you mounted /dev/sda2 correctly as it contains your kernel.

Let me look over things in more detail.

Please put your /etc/portage/make.conf onto a pastebin. I would like to see it all as it really is.
That's
Code:
mount /dev/sda6 /mnt/gentoo
wgetpaste  /mnt/gentoo/etc/portage/make.conf
and post the link.

Also the content of your /boot in full.
After the above,
Code:
mount /dev/sda2 /mnt/gentoo/boot
ls -l /mnt/gentoo/boot | wgetpaste


For completeness
Code:
ls -l /mnt/gentoo/boot/grub | wgetpaste


That will be three links. One to make.conf
One to the details of the content of /boot
One to the details of the content of /boot/grub.

-- edit --

The noauto option on /boot means that the /boot partition is not mounted every boot. When you want to update the kernel, you must mount it yourself.
The noatime option makes no difference to vfat as it does not save access times anyway.
It speeds up other filesystems as it saves a write for every read. Thats good for SSDs too.
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NeddySeagoon

Computer users fall into two groups:-
those that do backups
those that have never had a hard drive fail.
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AngryEasternFrog
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

First: https://paste.pound-python.org/show/8ElRMcwbTMV8fLwGEPZ1/
Second: https://paste.pound-python.org/show/nscewTv56iucaeAKBoqc/
Third: https://paste.pound-python.org/show/o7pniFLbicYglTXzox5r/

Edit:
To noauto/noatime, ssd here though.
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AngryEasternFrog
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2018 7:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that I might know the issue by now.
I have used the burned minimum installation on my USB stick.
Reading forum/listening to people they said that minimum does not support UEFI?...

What should I do then? Reinstall using liveCD version, or perhaps I could simply reconfigure grub.cfg or alike?
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ian.au
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2018 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Best install media, and all I've ever used to install gentoo is http://www.system-rescue-cd.org/

Comes with a heap of useful tools in case you ever need to actually rescue a system as a bonus.
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2018 5:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AngryEasternFrog,

UEFI support was added to the minimal liveCD recently.
If you have another liveCD, missing UEFI support, it should be adequate to boot with UEFI support and reinstall and reconfigure grub.

I think your problem may be more subtle that the installation media missing UEFI support.

You have /boot/grub/x86_64-efi containing your boot loader.
You also have /boot/EFI

I don't know how you tell your UEFI firmware that it needs to load something out of /boot/grub/x86_64-efi/ as I don't have a UEFI system to practice on.
I suspect that the UEFI firmware is looking in the wrong place for grub.
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2018 9:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am totally out of ideas honestly.

I have downloaded live iso, but the environment is bugged, it has lags and the mouse won't move properly.
Therefore I used my old minimum install back again (both would not run in uefi mode when chosen to do so from uefi, so I ran them in "usb" mode, prob. legacy)

I have:
Mounted /mnt/gentoo and /mnt/gentoo/boot
Then: I have read UUIDs and changed fstab to follow UUIDs, this way I assume that no matter what has what name under fdisk -l, following the UUID it always stays the same?
No idea.

I then mounted those other catalogues. /proc and /dev and like that (from the guide), else emerge wouldn't work (sorry, I am a noob).
I then again set the uefi flag at emerge in its config file, then I downloaded grub again. Installed it, but this time used --removable, as without it it would return me some warnings like:
"your system doesn't support uefi" or alike. Something along those lines, and I heard an advice that --removable could fix it.

After that I also created a new grub.cfg so it could properply point at /boot and /root I guess?

I chose grub at bios and that's it. Totally nothing, loads me only to uefi.


EDIT:
I will post some prints tomorrow, it's late rn.
Unless it is the dead end and nobody knows the answer. Then I will wonder a little on my own, I guess.

EDIT2:
It might sound stupid, but my rom option in UEFI is set to legacy mode ...
I don't even know why. It doesn't make the smallest sense to me, if the software favours Legacy ROM then how tf can I be using UEFI?...
Yet I always see the graphical interface and the producer says that the motherboard does have american megatrends inc. UEFI.
I tried changing it to UEFI and it didn't boot. Im confused.
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