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ulenrich
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:39 am    Post subject: next Linux longterm - do we have a Linux longterm leap year? Reply with quote

I was sure the next longterm Linux kernel as ever would be the fifth release after
4.19 - last longterm
4.20
5.0
5.1
5.2
5.3 - the actual kernel.org release. But I found this on
https://www.kernel.org/category/releases.html
Code:

Longterm release kernels
Version   Maintainer   Released   Projected EOL
5.4   Greg Kroah-Hartman & Sasha Levin   2019-XX-XX   Dec, 2021
4.19   Greg Kroah-Hartman & Sasha Levin   2018-10-22   Dec, 2020
4.14   Greg Kroah-Hartman & Sasha Levin   2017-11-12   Jan, 2024
4.9   Greg Kroah-Hartman & Sasha Levin   2016-12-11   Jan, 2023
4.4   Greg Kroah-Hartman & Sasha Levin   2016-01-10   Feb, 2022
3.16   Ben Hutchings   2014-08-03   Apr, 2020

Do we have a Linux longterm leap year (LLLY)?
Is there any mathematical formular to calculate the next LLLY ?
Or is it just a numberphile issue to integer 4, 14, 9 and 19
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mike155
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2019 12:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That reminds me of an old joke. A mathematician, a physicist, a computer scientist and an engineer were asked to calculate and write down prime numbers.

  • The mathematician: 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, ...

  • The physicist: 2, 3, 5, 7, 9 - oh, measurement error, 11, 13, ...

  • The computer scientist: 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, ...

  • The engineer: 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, ...
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TheLexx
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2019 4:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think the rule is that it it's been too long, time for another LLK. It's basically whenever someone feels like making one. Although I'm sure you can pay some quants to come up with some computer induced pareidolia.
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ulenrich
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2019 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So I suffer from self induced pattern recognition of my own brain when asking this question. @the_Lexx thanx for broaden my self-awareness
I assumed the upstrem writer of the html page had forgotten to count for v4.20 or v5.0
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Anon-E-moose
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2019 1:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had expected a LTS the last couple of releases. *shrugs*
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krinn
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2019 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You guys see the irony of wishing a new release of a kernel that should be use long time :)

I think a "logical" answer would be: when one reach EOL, a new one popup, else the number of kernels to maintain will grow to death
(i dont know, it just seems logic)
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TheLexx
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2019 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

krinn wrote:
I think a "logical" answer would be: when one reach EOL, a new one popup, else the number of kernels to maintain will grow to death
(i dont know, it just seems logic)

I feel that this answer was kinda/sorta true. I suppose if I had an hour to kill I could research the https://www.kernel.org/category/releases.html page with the waybackmachine. But rather than that I would rather speculate from my own imperfect memory.

It seemed that Greg Kroah-Hartman maintained about 3 LTS kernels at any one time and when one of those went EOL, they would with some sort of "black magic" pick a new one to maintain for "a while". As I remember, there was one LTS kernel that about 3 months prior to the schedule EOL, someone else picked the maintenance on it. The new person then maintained it for another 12/24 months.

Also it should be noted that a clearly defined list of LTS kernels was not always the paradigm. As I remember, there were kernels that claimed the name LTS all the way back to 2008. However there was not always a clear definition of what constituted a LTS kernel or complete list of a definite leader of each LTS kernel.

I seamed to remember when "I lived in that apartment" (some where around the year 2008-2011) the list of LTS kernels disappeared from kernel.org until a better description of what constituted a LTS kernel was and who was responsible for maintaining them was created/defined. This was a scary time in my life. 8O :wink:
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Hu
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 12, 2019 12:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rather than use the wayback machine, you could use git history to count how many releases each kernel got before it was abandoned, and look at the release date of the last release in a line versus the release of the x.0 kernel of that line from Linus. Check v4.9 from Linus vs. v4.9.x from Greg, for example.
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ulenrich
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 13, 2019 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found 13 is the most little prime which one can sum by the squares of two other prime numbers (thanx to mike155). Linux-4.20 was added as a leap year addition because the normal 5 releases per year up to the next LTS was getting earlier in the years. So this years irregularities was about a leap to keep it late in the year and to keep the squares of 2+3 at the end of each LTS.
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