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kentsin
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Joined: 08 Dec 2002
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Location: Macao

PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2004 4:47 am    Post subject: Install to iMac Reply with quote

I am planning to install Gentoo to my iMac running 10.2. Since I am new to PPC linux, I would like to get some suggestions here:

1. Can I use the liveCD to backup the current HD to DVDs? How?

2. How many space is needed for Linux? What partation scheme is best? The current HD is 40Gb and I plan to use parted to empty a new partation for Linux.

3. In case of failure, how could I restore the original disk image?


Thank you in advance.
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cottonmouth
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Joined: 24 Jan 2004
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2004 9:20 am    Post subject: Re: Install to iMac Reply with quote

kentsin wrote:

1. Can I use the liveCD to backup the current HD to DVDs? How?

Sorry, I do not know if it's possible, but I would guess it's not. The installation CD's are made with installation in mind, and as such it's not their job to support more "advanced" features like DVD-recording. If you have a choice, do the backup beforehand using your 10.2. And please, verify it.

Quote:

2. How many space is needed for Linux? What partation scheme is best? The current HD is 40Gb and I plan to use parted to empty a new partation for Linux.

I assume you mean "how much space is needed for a GUI-desktop workstation". You'll find a lot of useful info here:
http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/handbook.xml?part=1&chap=4#doc_chap2
The size of your swap partition should be in proportion to the amount of RAM on your box. The installation handbook suggests a swap area that is between one and two times the size of the physical RAM in your system.

How much space obviously depends on your use. My system runs on a 20G disk. 15G is in use, and of those, 10G is mp3, so go figure.

Quote:

3. In case of failure, how could I restore the original disk image?

Others can give a more knowledgeble answer, but from me you'll get some advice: Assume Murphys law and conclude that you can't, i.e., that if everything fails, you'll have to reinstall OS X and restore your content from backup. Although the chances of failure are small, rest assure that P(failure) is raised by an order of magnitude equalling the importance of your non-backuped content. :-)

I was a bit shaky when I did my Gentoo installation, but the docs are good, and the forum really helps out too. If you can have access to them on another machine, things really are not that scary.

One very good thing about linux is the modularity, meaning that if you get your system up and running in console mode, but you are having problems with the GUI, the console tools are so good that you should be able to resolve any problems and then move on. This as opposed to my old WinXP which really was a "all or nothing" system; if one little minor thing failed, the whole system froze and I couldn't use the machine at all.

Welcome and good luck.
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kentsin
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2004 12:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does the order of partation important?

I have read somewhere I need to make a 800K partation first to keep the boot sector, Are there 4 partations limits here? What is the order of Linux and 10.2 and classic?
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fb
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2004 9:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

I don't know the exact limit for openfirmware but it is far more
than 4. I am assuming that you have a "new world" machine,
I have a 800 MHz G4 iMac and I have currently 9 partition
on my 40GB hard drive:
hda1 : partition map
hda2 : apple boot (the special partition you mentionned)
hda3 : apple free (some stuff from the apple install I didn't touch)
hda4 : HFS (osX)
hda5 : same as hda3 (128MB by the way)
hda6 : HFS (os9)
hda7 : swap (512MB)
hda8 : / (reiserfs 10 GB)
hda9 : /home (reiserfs too 3.5 GB)
Note their is no /boot partition. While the documentation doesn't
mention anything about separating / and /home it is something I
usually do.
It is recommended that the apple bootstrap be on hda2. But that is
one the beauty of openfirmware you can reorder partitions without
destroying them and recreating them in the right place. If I remember
well my appleboot partition started its live as hda7 and then I moved
it in position hda2 with mac-fdisk. The partition order is kept in the
partition map on hda1 and doesn't have to be the same as the physical
order.
I recomand that you print and read the Gentoo documentation
at the following addresses:
http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/handbook.xml?part=1
It is the Gentoo install handbook and it contains instruction for all
supported systems. I found most of my answers there. Note
that it is only a guide for the base install. It doesn't tell you how
to install the GUI.
http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/gentoo-ppc-install.xml
It is a ppc install specific guide. It is a bit updated compared to
the one I used so there probably some more interesting info there.

I n case of problem don't hesitate to search the forum or ask!
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SAckerman
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Joined: 18 Aug 2002
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 2004 6:10 am    Post subject: A little unclear... Reply with quote

Now I am an x86 Linux/windows user and have become totally fed up so I am completely de-M$-ifying myself once and for all (a story for another time). I just bought a dual G5 the other day and should arive tomorrow. I will be using an ACARD hardware raid card to mirror the 2 - 250Gb SATA drives.

Here is the issue: I wish to dual boot with 10.3.x and Gentoo but I am a total newbie when it comes to OSX and the way the ppc partitioning works.

What are these partition maps and apple boot partitions and such? I imagine I need to have OSX installed and working before I attempt to add Gentoo but what are the preperation steps I need to perform before I install OSX on the new drive config?

I wish to setup like this:

25-30Gb - OSX
100Gb - development area in ext3
100Gb - /home in ext3
15Gb - / in ext3
the rest for /var in ext3

I know I am missing the special partitions here but these are the details and knowledge I am lacking. Can anyone point me in the right direction, the Gentoo docs are missing these details especially the dual boot part?

Thanks ahead of time...
Steve
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fb
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Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 636
Location: New Zealand

PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 2004 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

You have to use the OSX install disk to repartition your hard drive.
The partition map is already there and I don't think it can be erased.
With the OSX disk utilities you should create a partition for OS X and make
it of the size you desire. Eventually make a small partition for OS 9 if you
wish to use it. It is better to have it on a separate partition.
Make the rest of the disk as one huge partition.
I did not do the previous bit myself, so I cannot give more details on the procedure.
Reinstall the Mac OSes on their partitions and restore whatever backup
you have previously made before repartitionning.
Once you are booted in linux you can use mac-fdisk to delete the huge partition you have put aside and create in its place:
-an appleboot partition (look at the options of mac-fdisk)
-a swap partition
-whatever linux partitions you want to create, however you shouldn't create a separate /boot partition
There are some instructions on that under the section "preparing the disks"
(chapter 4) of the Gentoo install guide.
Before quiting mac-fdisk you should reorder your partitions (with the r
comand) so that the appleboot partition is in hda2 (hda1 is the partion map).
Then you can create the filesystem on your linux partition, look the section
4.i of the Gentoo install guide (still in chapter 4).

Hope that help.
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kentsin
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2004 4:38 am    Post subject: Backup and home Reply with quote

What (free) software is suitable to backup the existing HFS partations to DVDs? Are there any boot cd which allow me to do the Backup/Restore? I am afraid if I done something wrong, I could not bring up OSX to make a proper restore.

I read the parted manual from gnu site, the latest version they have is 1.6 and the manual say that parted do not support resize of HFS. However, I got from this forum that parted is able to resize HFS, can someone confirm this?

If I want the Home to be mounted from both osx and linux, what filesystem type is best?
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SAckerman
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Joined: 18 Aug 2002
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Location: California

PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2004 11:23 am    Post subject: OSX and Linux filesystem Reply with quote

You can access ext2 and ext3 filesystems from OSX with a driver you can get at http://sourceforge.net/projects/ext2fsx/. I haven't had a chance to use it yet but I have read good thngs about it...

Steve
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