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tilt
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2004 7:26 pm    Post subject: HOWTO: mobile phone, Bluetooth and GNOME Reply with quote

HOWTO: mobile phone, Bluetooth and GNOME

(Updated! Now includes chapter about object push)

I've just successfully installed Bluetooth support and managed to connect my SonyEricsson T630 mobile phone. Since there's a lot of information on the web about Bluetooth under Linux but I couldn't find a Gentoo-specific tutorial I decided to write one :-)

I hope this tutorial is generic enough so that it's useful to people with other hardware, too. Fortunately, Bluetooth virtually works out of the box with Gentoo using stable packages only!

My hardware:
  • i386 system (Athlon)
  • Kernel 2.4.25 (gentoo-sources)
  • Abe UB20 Bluetooth USB dongle
  • SonyEricsson T630
  • GNOME (sorry, haven't tried command line tools or KDE)


What I wanted to do (read: what's covered in this tutorial):
  • Get Linux to recognize my Bluetooth dongle
  • Get Linux to detect my mobile phone
  • Transfer images and sounds to my mobile and back again


What I haven't done yet (and thus isn't covered here):
  • Establish a dial-up connection using Bluetooth and my mobile phone
  • Use my mobile as a remote control
  • all the other fancy Bluetooth stuff that might be possible (networking and so on)


Okay, let's start, shall we?


1. Configure kernel for Bluetooth support

Like USB or FireWire you should have the latest kernel drivers for bluetooth. The latest stable gentoo-sources are 2.4.25 and Bluetooth's working for me. If you're using a previous version your mileage may vary. Also, make sure that USB hotplugging is working as it won't be covered in this tutorial. I assume it's already working for you.

Go to /usr/src/linux and run "make menuconfig" to set up Bluetooth. You may compile the features into the kernel but I used modules. Works well and saves you from recompiling the whole kernel.

First, go to "USB support" and make sure that "USB Bluetooth support" is disabled.
Then, go to "Bluetooth support" and at least select the following options:

Code:
<M> Bluetooth subsystem support
<M> L2CAP protocol support
<M> RFCOMM protocol support
Bluetooth device drivers ---> <M> HCI USB driver


(RFCOMM might not be necessary, but as long as it's a module there's no disadvantage in compiling it...)

Exit, Save your configuration and do "make dep" followed by "make modules modules_install".


2. Emerge the packages:

If you're using GNOME, you can just do:

Code:
emerge -a gnome-bluetooth


as it will pull in all required packages. If you don't have GNOME you should install the following packages:

Code:
emerge -a bluez-utils bluez-sdp openobex



3. Attach the dongle:

There's a lot of Bluetooth hardware available, but as long as it's a USB device, you won't have to do more than connect it to a USB port now. Type dmesg to see if your dongle has been recognizes by Linux. It should print something like this:

Code:
# dmesg
(...)
hub.c: new USB device 00:07.3-1, assigned address 2
usb.c: USB device 2 (vend/prod 0x400/0x807) is not claimed by any active driver.
usbdevfs: USBDEVFS_CONTROL failed dev 2 rqt 128 rq 6 len 18 ret -6
BlueZ Core ver 2.3 Copyright (C) 2000,2001 Qualcomm Inc
Written 2000,2001 by Maxim Krasnyansky <maxk@qualcomm.com>
BlueZ HCI USB driver ver 2.4 Copyright (C) 2000,2001 Qualcomm Inc
Written 2000,2001 by Maxim Krasnyansky <maxk@qualcomm.com>
usb.c: registered new driver hci_usb
usbdevfs: USBDEVFS_CONTROL failed dev 2 rqt 128 rq 6 len 18 ret -6
usbdevfs: USBDEVFS_CONTROL failed dev 2 rqt 128 rq 6 len 18 ret -6
usbdevfs: USBDEVFS_CONTROL failed dev 2 rqt 128 rq 6 len 9 ret -6
usbdevfs: USBDEVFS_CONTROL failed dev 2 rqt 128 rq 6 len 18 ret -6


Look for the "BlueZ" lines. They're telling you that your dongle has been recognized as a USB HCI device. In my case, the kernel modules have been loaded automatically. This might not be the case for everyone. See http://members.dodo.com.au/~botting/phone/ on how to edit your /etc/modules.conf if necessary. Keep in mind though, that editing modules.conf directly is not the Gentoo way. Read the man page of modules-update for more.


4. Start the Bluetooth device:

At the console, type "hciconfig" to see the Bluetooth HCI device that has been installed. There should be a hci0 device but it should be marked "DOWN".

Code:
# /etc/init.d/bluetooth start


This will start Gentoo's Bluetooth init script. Now, call hciconfig again.

Code:
# hciconfig

hci0:   Type: USB
        BD Address: 08:00:17:1B:42:96 ACL MTU: 339:4  SCO MTU: 60:9
        UP RUNNING PSCAN ISCAN
        RX bytes:5603 acl:177 sco:0 events:209 errors:0
        TX bytes:40682 acl:270 sco:0 commands:30 errors:0


The device is active now as can be seen by "UP RUNNING" in line 3. If you want to start Bluetooth at boot time, add the script to the default runlevel:

Code:
# rc-update add bluetooth default



5. Let's detect the phone!

The "hcitool" command line tool allows you to scan your environment for bluetooth devices. Make sure that your phone is switched on and Bluetooth is enabled. Then type:

Code:
# hcitool dev
Devices:
        hci0    08:00:17:1B:42:96


That was your local device. Nothing special here.

Code:
# hcitool inq
Inquiring ...
        00:0E:07:37:7C:BD       clock offset: 0x7080    class: 0x520204
# hcitool scan
Scanning ...
        00:0E:07:37:7C:BD       T630


Yay! That's my cell phone! "T630" is the factory's default name. You can change that on your cell phone of course.


6. Use GNOME to transfer stuff to your mobile

If you've emerged gnome-bluetooth, the fun has just begun. I'm running the yet masked GNOME 2.6. If you're still running 2.4 things are hopefully the same.

First, no need to be root anymore. Log into GNOME as a regular user and open a terminal. Type "gnome-bluetooth-admin" to launch the GUI version of hcitool. Click "Scan" and after a while your mobile phone should appear. (see this Screenshot (116 kB))

Next, launch Nautilus and browse to "bluetooth:///". Marvel at the icon depicting your cell phone! You might be tempted to double click on it but this won't work. Instead, you need to drag&drop files onto the icon to transfer them to your mobile phone.

Background images for the T630 are JPEG images with a size of 128x127 pixels. Use the gimp to create an image yourself or go to sites like http://www.myt610.net to get all the backgrounds you need. You're not limited to images. For example, ".thm" files are themes and they can be transfered as well. Midi files (.mid) are used as ring tones. Here are two examples to get started:


Shortly after you've dropped a file onto the icon, your mobile phone should pop up a dialog asking you to accept the incoming file. Do this quickly or Nautilus will time out after a few seconds. If you accept the incoming transfer, the file is uploaded to your phone and stored in the appropriate location of your mobile phone's memory. Go to your pictures folder to see the image or go to "Settings" -> "Display" -> "Themes" to select the new theme.


7. OBEX object push:

Let's not stop here! There is, of course, a way to transfer data from your mobile phone back to your PC as well. This is called object push. Log in as root and have a look at some configuration files located in /etc/bluetooth. The first one is hcid.conf:

Code:
nano -w /etc/bluetooth/hcid.conf


Scroll down to this line:

Code:
name "BlueZ (%d)"


This is the name that will identify your PC to other Bluetooth devices. Change it to something more meaningful. Next, take a look at the script /etc/bluetooth/pin. This is its contents:

Code:
#!/bin/sh
echo "PIN:1234"


Change the number to an arbitrary PIN code and leave the rest of the file as it is. As a security measure, people sending data to your PC via Bluetooth need to know this code.

As user, start the GNOME OBEX server. It can be found in the Applications menu under System Tools -> Bluetooth File Sharing (alternatively, launch gnome-obex-server in a terminal). A blue icon appears in your notification area.

Depending on your mobile phone there's a menu item somewhere that allows you to scan your environment for Bluetooth devices. Here's how it works on my SonyEriccson T630: Go to "Connectivity" -> "Bluetooth" -> "My devices". Click "New device" to have the phone search for your PC. After a few seconds the name you've just configured should come up and you'll be able to add your PC to the list of known devices. Upon adding, you'll have to enter the the PIN you specified in /etc/bluetooth/pin.

Now you can go to the phone's picture folder and select an image. Click "More" -> "Send" -> "Via Bluetooth" and choose your PC from the list. The OBEX icon in GNOME's notification area should start blinking and the file will be transfered. It will end up in your home directory, so take a look now :-)


8. Resouces used and thanks to:

That's it! Here's another screenshot showing how smoothly everything works:

Screenshot (142 kB)

I hope you've found this tutorial useful, even if you don't own a USB dongle and a T630. However, the process should be the same for other modern mobile phones. Just look for the right kind of images and themes suitable for your phone. Here are some links to pages that were useful to me:



Last edited by tilt on Fri Apr 16, 2004 8:45 pm; edited 3 times in total
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jjasghar
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2004 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

awesome thank you sooo much, i tryed this at one point as got so lost
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2004 3:16 pm    Post subject: Another note of thanks Reply with quote

After trying unsuccessfully to get Bluetooth working under RedHat 9 (and under Windows XP SP1 - which apparently has issues with my dongle) I can't believe one emerge gets it working under Gentoo!!

I've only been using Gentoo for about a week and I'm hooked big time!!!

For the record I'm using an Actiontec bluetooth dongle and Nokia 3650 phone.

Now I just need to find out how to get gPHPEdit updated to a later version (than the ACCEPT_KEYWORDS='~x86' version)
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tilt
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2004 8:04 pm    Post subject: Re: Another note of thanks Reply with quote

You're welcome.

andyjeffries wrote:
For the record I'm using an Actiontec bluetooth dongle and Nokia 3650 phone.


If you don't mind, it would be great if you told the BlueZ developers to include your dongle in the list of supported hardware as it's not listed yet. Send an e-mail to their mailing list and include the output of:

Code:
hciconfig -a


as well as

Code:
hciconfig hci0 revision
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tilt
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2004 8:47 pm    Post subject: Re: HOWTO: mobile phone, Bluetooth and GNOME Reply with quote

I've just updated the tutorial to include OBEX object push which means you'll be able to send data from your mobile phone back to your PC!
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 17, 2004 8:31 am    Post subject: Re: HOWTO: mobile phone, Bluetooth and GNOME Reply with quote

tilt wrote:
I've just updated the tutorial to include OBEX object push which means you'll be able to send data from your mobile phone back to your PC!


For some reason it worked for me before :-)

I just run gnome-obex-server and bluetooth sent items appeared in my home folder.

Cheers,


Andy
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ice_cool
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 17, 2004 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What about syncronization.
Can I syncrnonise my phone contacts with my PC contacts?
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AJerman
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 17, 2004 9:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I plug in my dongle Gentoo locks up :S
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 18, 2004 4:21 pm    Post subject: Transferring contacts Reply with quote

ice_cool wrote:
What about syncronization.
Can I syncrnonise my phone contacts with my PC contacts?


All modern Bluetooth-enabled phones should be able to do this, but I've never tried. With the T630 you should be able to send contacts as you do with pictures. I don't remember which file format though but it was a standardized one. Maybe vCard? If you're successful please let me know :-)

Edit: Yes, it is vCard! (At least on the T630). You can send contacts from your phone to your PC and they'll end up as a .vcf file in your home directory. Should be easy to do it the other way round!


Last edited by tilt on Sun Apr 18, 2004 4:36 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 18, 2004 4:31 pm    Post subject: Gentoo locks up Reply with quote

AJerman wrote:
When I plug in my dongle Gentoo locks up :S


What's your kernel version? Is USB working for other devices (mice, cameras)?
Also, your Dongle might not (yet) be supported by Linux. Check out bluez.org. They've go a list of supported hardware as well as a mailing list for support. Problems with lock ups show up on the list every now and then so maybe there's something in the archives to help you.
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 19, 2004 3:22 am    Post subject: Re: Gentoo locks up Reply with quote

tilt wrote:
AJerman wrote:
When I plug in my dongle Gentoo locks up :S


What's your kernel version? Is USB working for other devices (mice, cameras)?
Also, your Dongle might not (yet) be supported by Linux. Check out bluez.org. They've go a list of supported hardware as well as a mailing list for support. Problems with lock ups show up on the list every now and then so maybe there's something in the archives to help you.


Yeah, I have 2.6.5, and everything with USB locks up the system. Hotplug is screwed up. It would be nice to get that fixed sometime soon lol.

Edit: Messed around with it a little tonight and got it working! YAY! Now I am using my Microsoft Bluetooth Mouse! :)
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 19, 2004 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK, having posted success the other day, I now have to report that it's not so much success...

I have bluetooth starting in the default run level, but I obviously don't leave my USB dongle hanging out all the time (man, that sounds dirty....).

When I plug it in, nothing happens and I can't use bluetooth. No amount of
Code:
/etc/init.d/bluetooth stop
and
Code:
/etc/init.d/bluetooth start
will work. Stop tells me [!!] and start says "WARNING: "bluetooth" has already been started".

Anyway, I found that if I manually run hcid it then works.

So, what's the answer? Is there a way of having a given script run upon hotplugging a USB device. I'm not a Linux n00b, but I am to Gentoo, so please be gentle if this is something that Gentoo'rs should know... :-)
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 19, 2004 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

andyjeffries wrote:
So, what's the answer? Is there a way of having a given script run upon hotplugging a USB device. I'm not a Linux n00b, but I am to Gentoo, so please be gentle if this is something that Gentoo'rs should know... :-)


AFAIK hotplugging is all about running scripts when a device is attached. The hardware forum would be the right place to get support :-)
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 21, 2004 11:25 pm    Post subject: You can be my hero, baby! You can take... my breath away! Reply with quote

AJerman, you would be my absolute hero if you could write-up a little how-to, or send me some config files, or something! My $150 MS Desktop is about 6 inches from getting recycled and I don't want to have to do that!
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 24, 2004 2:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you're looking for a good way to sync your phone with Linux there's a great app called Multisync which is perfect for this. You can sync over blootooth (or irda) and it has plugins for evolution, zaurus/opie handhelds, wince devices, ldap (openldap), cell phones which work with irmc, syncml devices, and more. It will probably become part of gnome at some point but for the time being you can just emerge multisync and have it all working.
As far as the bluetooth lockups go, I don't have any problems when I plug it in but if I don't do a "hciconfig hci0 down" before I pull mine out my system will lock up (I have hcid always running). I'll probably look into fixing that at some point.....[/url]
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 25, 2004 4:14 pm    Post subject: Re: You can be my hero, baby! You can take... my breath awa Reply with quote

Nuke Waste wrote:
AJerman, you would be my absolute hero if you could write-up a little how-to, or send me some config files, or something! My $150 MS Desktop is about 6 inches from getting recycled and I don't want to have to do that!


Sorry for the late reply, been busy.

There already is a howto :)

https://forums.gentoo.org/viewtopic.php?t=121214&highlight=howto+microsoft+bluetooth

After I got the hotplug issues sorted out, I just loosely followed what that said, and it works :). If you can't get it working from there, send me a PM or IM me and I will help you out :)
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malloc
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2004 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well 2 thumbs up for this guide it totally rocks :D
I'm just writing to say that this will work with kde and udev just as fine as with devfs and gnome.
As for udev you don't need to write any special rules it just works out-of-the-box. As for kde you just need to emerge kdebluetooth and openobex and the rest is similar to the gnome part.
The first time you run kde it will ask if you want to run kdebluetoothd on start wich you should say yes.
Then you'll get a notice whenever your bluetooth dongle is recognized by the kdebluetoothd.
After that you just need to click the bluetooth icon on your kicker and wait a little moment for your phone to be recognized, then there's a very fine interface through konq from wich you can do everything you need.
Hope it helps.

Edited: Forgot to mention that this was done using a pure udev system runing on a 2.6.5 kernel (love-sources to be more accurate)
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 29, 2004 5:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Awesome ! ! ! !

I cant wait to get to work and switch on my laptop. Have been looking for such a tutorial for ages,. last time I tried to connect my phone to my gentoo laptop, I ended up freezing the phone.

Will post any errrors I get.

Thanks again, this is much needed .

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 30, 2004 8:40 pm    Post subject: SonyEricsson P800 is not seen by "hcitool scan" Reply with quote

I have the problem that my SonyEricsson P800 is not seen by "hcitool scan". I got no problem detecting a HP Pocket Pc by the same command, any hints?
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PostPosted: Sat May 01, 2004 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Please forget my post, it is of sort "RTFM" and ambiguous translations of menu items to other languages, german in my case. If i set Bluetooth "Erkennbar" instaead of "Ein" the P800 is recognized. I thought "Ein" would include "Erkennbar", but it did not.

Sorry, Valentin.
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PostPosted: Thu May 06, 2004 4:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm using kernel 2.6.5 and am having trouble configuring the kernel.

I found

Device Drivers > USB support > USB Bluetooth TTY Support

but not other mention of Bluetooth in any of the menus.

Can someone point me in the right direction please ? :)
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PostPosted: Thu May 06, 2004 4:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found it :)

Device Drivers > Networking support > Bluetooth support
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PostPosted: Thu May 06, 2004 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Gnome Phone Manager (no ebuld - 2004.MAY.6) seems like an excellent addition to the Gnome Bluetooth Subsystem (ebuild).
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PostPosted: Tue May 11, 2004 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey, the tutorial is great!!! Bluetooth was up and running after some minutes...

But :)
One problem - I want to use the "serial emulation" to access my S55 over bluetooth using (g)scmxx. How can this be done? What do I need to configure?

Thanks in advance!
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PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2004 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I get until point 3 / point 4... :-/

dmesg gives the following:
Code:

hub.c: port 1, portstatus 100, change 0, 12 Mb/s
hub.c: port 2, portstatus 100, change 0, 12 Mb/s
ehci_hcd 00:1d.7: GetStatus port 3 status 001803 POWER sig=j  CSC CONNECT
hub.c: port 3, portstatus 501, change 1, 480 Mb/s
hub.c: port 3 connection change
hub.c: port 3, portstatus 501, change 1, 480 Mb/s
hub.c: port 3, portstatus 501, change 0, 480 Mb/s
hub.c: port 3, portstatus 501, change 0, 480 Mb/s
hub.c: port 3, portstatus 501, change 0, 480 Mb/s
hub.c: port 3, portstatus 501, change 0, 480 Mb/s
hub.c: port 3, portstatus 511, change 0, 480 Mb/s
hub.c: port 3 of hub 1 not reset yet, waiting 10ms
hub.c: port 3, portstatus 511, change 0, 480 Mb/s
hub.c: port 3 of hub 1 not reset yet, waiting 10ms
ehci_hcd 00:1d.7: port 3 full speed --> companion
ehci_hcd 00:1d.7: GetStatus port 3 status 003801 POWER OWNER sig=j  CONNECT
hub.c: port 3, portstatus 0, change 10, 12 Mb/s
ehci_hcd 00:1d.7: free_config  devnum 0
hub.c: port 4, portstatus 503, change 0, 480 Mb/s
hub.c: port 5, portstatus 100, change 0, 12 Mb/s
hub.c: port 6, portstatus 100, change 0, 12 Mb/s
hub.c: port 7, portstatus 100, change 0, 12 Mb/s
hub.c: port 8, portstatus 100, change 0, 12 Mb/s
hub.c: port 1, portstatus 101, change 1, 12 Mb/s
hub.c: port 1 connection change
hub.c: port 1, portstatus 101, change 1, 12 Mb/s
hub.c: port 1, portstatus 101, change 0, 12 Mb/s
hub.c: port 1, portstatus 101, change 0, 12 Mb/s
hub.c: port 1, portstatus 101, change 0, 12 Mb/s
hub.c: port 1, portstatus 101, change 0, 12 Mb/s
hub.c: port 1, portstatus 103, change 0, 12 Mb/s
hub.c: new USB device 00:1d.1-1, assigned address 2
usb.c: kmalloc IF 9cd217a0, numif 3
usb.c: new device strings: Mfr=0, Product=0, SerialNumber=0
usb.c: unhandled interfaces on device
usb.c: USB device 2 (vend/prod 0xa5c/0x2033) is not claimed by any active driver.
  Length              = 18
  DescriptorType      = 01
  USB version         = 1.01
  Vendor:Product      = 0a5c:2033
  MaxPacketSize0      = 64
  NumConfigurations   = 1
  Device version      = 0.a0
  Device Class:SubClass:Protocol = e0:01:01
    Unknown class
Configuration:
  bLength             =    9
  bDescriptorType     =   02
  wTotalLength        = 00c8
  bNumInterfaces      =   03
  bConfigurationValue =   01
  iConfiguration      =   00
  bmAttributes        =   a0
  MaxPower            =  100mA

  Interface: 0
  Alternate Setting:  0
    bLength             =    9
    bDescriptorType     =   04
    bInterfaceNumber    =   00
    bAlternateSetting   =   00
    bNumEndpoints       =   03
    bInterface Class:SubClass:Protocol =   e0:01:01
    iInterface          =   00
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   81 (in)
      bmAttributes        =   03 (Interrupt)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0010
      bInterval           =   01
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   82 (in)
      bmAttributes        =   02 (Bulk)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0040
      bInterval           =   01
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   02 (out)
      bmAttributes        =   02 (Bulk)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0040
      bInterval           =   01

  Interface: 1
  Alternate Setting:  0
    bLength             =    9
    bDescriptorType     =   04
    bInterfaceNumber    =   01
    bAlternateSetting   =   00
    bNumEndpoints       =   02
    bInterface Class:SubClass:Protocol =   e0:01:01
    iInterface          =   00
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   83 (in)
      bmAttributes        =   01 (Isochronous)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0000
      bInterval           =   01
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   03 (out)
      bmAttributes        =   01 (Isochronous)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0000
      bInterval           =   01
  Alternate Setting:  1
    bLength             =    9
    bDescriptorType     =   04
    bInterfaceNumber    =   01
    bAlternateSetting   =   01
    bNumEndpoints       =   02
    bInterface Class:SubClass:Protocol =   e0:01:01
    iInterface          =   00
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   83 (in)
      bmAttributes        =   01 (Isochronous)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0010
      bInterval           =   01
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   03 (out)
      bmAttributes        =   01 (Isochronous)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0010
      bInterval           =   01
  Alternate Setting:  2
    bLength             =    9
    bDescriptorType     =   04
    bInterfaceNumber    =   01
    bAlternateSetting   =   02
    bNumEndpoints       =   02
    bInterface Class:SubClass:Protocol =   e0:01:01
    iInterface          =   00
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   83 (in)
      bmAttributes        =   01 (Isochronous)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0020
      bInterval           =   01
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   03 (out)
      bmAttributes        =   01 (Isochronous)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0020
      bInterval           =   01
  Alternate Setting:  3
    bLength             =    9
    bDescriptorType     =   04
    bInterfaceNumber    =   01
    bAlternateSetting   =   03
    bNumEndpoints       =   02
    bInterface Class:SubClass:Protocol =   e0:01:01
    iInterface          =   00
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   83 (in)
      bmAttributes        =   01 (Isochronous)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0020
      bInterval           =   01
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   03 (out)
      bmAttributes        =   01 (Isochronous)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0020
      bInterval           =   01
  Alternate Setting:  4
    bLength             =    9
    bDescriptorType     =   04
    bInterfaceNumber    =   01
    bAlternateSetting   =   04
    bNumEndpoints       =   02
    bInterface Class:SubClass:Protocol =   e0:01:01
    iInterface          =   00
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   83 (in)
      bmAttributes        =   01 (Isochronous)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0040
      bInterval           =   01
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   03 (out)
      bmAttributes        =   01 (Isochronous)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0040
      bInterval           =   01
  Alternate Setting:  5
    bLength             =    9
    bDescriptorType     =   04
    bInterfaceNumber    =   01
    bAlternateSetting   =   05
    bNumEndpoints       =   02
    bInterface Class:SubClass:Protocol =   e0:01:01
    iInterface          =   00
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   83 (in)
      bmAttributes        =   01 (Isochronous)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0040
      bInterval           =   01
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   03 (out)
      bmAttributes        =   01 (Isochronous)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0040
      bInterval           =   01

  Interface: 2
  Alternate Setting:  0
    bLength             =    9
    bDescriptorType     =   04
    bInterfaceNumber    =   02
    bAlternateSetting   =   00
    bNumEndpoints       =   02
    bInterface Class:SubClass:Protocol =   ff:ff:ff
    iInterface          =   00
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   84 (in)
      bmAttributes        =   02 (Bulk)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0020
      bInterval           =   01
    Endpoint:
      bLength             =    7
      bDescriptorType     =   05
      bEndpointAddress    =   04 (out)
      bmAttributes        =   02 (Bulk)
      wMaxPacketSize      = 0020
      bInterval           =   01
usb.c: kusbd: /sbin/hotplug add 2
usb.c: kusbd: /sbin/hotplug add 2
usb.c: kusbd: /sbin/hotplug add 2
hub.c: port 2, portstatus 100, change 0, 12 Mb/s
hub.c: port 1, portstatus 103, change 0, 12 Mb/s
hub.c: port 2, portstatus 100, change 0, 12 Mb/s
BlueZ Core ver 2.3 Copyright (C) 2000,2001 Qualcomm Inc
Written 2000,2001 by Maxim Krasnyansky <maxk@qualcomm.com>
BlueZ HCI USB driver ver 2.4 Copyright (C) 2000,2001 Qualcomm Inc
Written 2000,2001 by Maxim Krasnyansky <maxk@qualcomm.com>
usb.c: registered new driver hci_usb
host/usb-uhci.c: ENXIO 80000280, flags 0, urb 9cd21920, burb 9cd21a20
usbdevfs: USBDEVFS_CONTROL failed dev 2 rqt 128 rq 6 len 18 ret -6
host/usb-uhci.c: ENXIO 80000280, flags 0, urb 9cd21920, burb 9cd21a20
usbdevfs: USBDEVFS_CONTROL failed dev 2 rqt 128 rq 6 len 18 ret -6
BlueZ L2CAP ver 2.3 Copyright (C) 2000,2001 Qualcomm Inc
Written 2000,2001 by Maxim Krasnyansky <maxk@qualcomm.com>


But there's no hci0 device, and hciconfig doesn't give any output at all...

I have a Tecom BT3030 (identified by lsusb as BCM2033), and emerged the latest (unstable) versions of the packages mentioned. My kernel is the most recent gs-sources one.

Where did I go wrong...? :-/
_________________
Greetz,
Evert Meulie
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