Gentoo Forums
Gentoo Forums
Gentoo Forums
Quick Search: in
Installing Gentoo 2004.3: Stage 1 NPTL on a Stage 3 Tarball
View unanswered posts
View posts from last 24 hours

Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18  Next  
Reply to topic    Gentoo Forums Forum Index Documentation, Tips & Tricks
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
kimchi_sg
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 26 Nov 2004
Posts: 2915
Location: Singapore

PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2005 3:46 pm    Post subject: Return of the one one-liner! And other tricks Reply with quote

Bring on the mayonaise: Optional frills for the install


This is a long post, but it is not the installation tutorial itself. You'll want page 1 for that. This is page 14. :P


Part 1: The one one-liner strikes back


1.1 >>> Preamble

Well, I suppose everyone who has read both this tutorial and ali3nx's "stage 1 developer's method" tutorial that preceded it will have noticed that the "gcc-config stress level reduction onliner" from ali3nx's has been broken up into at least 3 one-liners here: one for before updating make.conf, one for after updating make.conf, and one for after "emerge system". Well, here's how to do it ali3nx's way: all in one one-liner!

For those new to this "one-liner" business and wondering how this long command works, it is because the bash shell allows us to chain commands using the && operator. The maximum length of the command is limited to... 65,535 characters. Relax, we are not going to type that many characters in this long command. :D

Advantage of typing out the most time-consuming commands as a single one-line command:

  • More time for coffee breaks, walking the dog, eating donuts, etc.
  • No need to spend as much time waiting for one of the "sub-commands" to complete.
  • You will feel like a geek for using sed, the command-line text editor. "Look ma, I changed my make.conf with a single command!" :P


Pre-requisites for this to work:

  • A good pair of eyes.
  • Steady fingers.
  • Good ambient lighting. Do not do this in a dark room. :lol:



1.2 >>> How to Transfer this One-liner

I recommend using gpm and links while in the liveCD environment to transfer the text of the one-liner onto the command line. Here's how:

For non-screen users (which means most people):

  1. Press ALT + F2 to switch to console number 2.
  2. Fire up links and navigate from the forums main page down to this post.
    Code:
    links forums.gentoo.org

  3. Using the mouse, select the first line of the one-liner, in exactly the same way as you select text in any other text editor.
  4. Switch back to the installation console (console number 1) by pressing ALT + F1
  5. If your mouse has 3 or more buttons, middle-click to paste the copied text at the command prompt.
  6. If your mouse has only 2 buttons, click on both buttons at the same time to paste the text.
  7. DO NOT press ENTER yet, the command is still not in its entirety. Insert a space after the pasted text.
  8. Repeat steps 3 to 7 for the remaining lines of the one-liner.
  9. Please triple-check the pasted text to check that it matches exactly what is listed in the one-liner. Switch back to links in console 2 to take a look, if necessary.
  10. Finally, press ENTER to send the one-liner into action.

For users of screen:

  1. Press CTRL + A , c to create a new screen window. (screen is not synonymous with window here, hence the italics)
  2. Fire up links and navigate from the forums main page down to this post.
    Code:
    links forums.gentoo.org

  3. Scroll the page until all of the one-liner can be seen. Tip: Use the INSERT and DELETE keys to move up and down one line at a time, respectively.
  4. Enter text copy mode with CTRL + A , [
  5. Use the arrow keys to move the cursor until it is under the first character of the one-liner.
  6. Press ENTER. screen will display a confirmatory message in the lower left corner of the screen: "First mark set - column 32 line 34" (your column and line numbers may differ) This means that the starting mark of the selection to be copied has been set.
  7. Extend the selection with the arrow keys, until the entire command has been selected.
  8. Press ENTER again. screen will display another message: "Copied 1116 characters into buffer" (buffer is the linux term for "clipboard").
  9. Since the one-liner is indented by links when it renders the page, we need to trim out the extra spaces and line breaks in the buffer copy.
  10. Press CTRL + A , > (CTRL + A , SHIFT + .) to write the buffer's contents into a temporary file ( /tmp/screen-exchange , according to screen's confirmation).
  11. Using your favourite editor, edit /tmp/screen-exchange to remove all the line breaks and (optionally) extra spaces. The entire text of the file must fit on one line.
  12. Once done, press CTRL + A , < to "slurp" the contents of the file back into the buffer. screen will display: "Slurped 807 characters into buffer". This is the number of characters in the one-liner without extra line breaks and redundant spaces.
  13. Go back to the installation window, which is most likely to be window 0: CTRL + A, 0
  14. Press CTRL + A , ] to paste the edited one-liner at the prompt, ready for execution.
  15. Finally, press ENTER to watch it all take off. :D

1.3 >>> Public Service Messages

This one-liner is to be entered only right after step 6.7.2 (editing /etc/locales.build)! It will take you all the way to step 8.3 (configuration). That's the most time-consuming part of this tutorial.

This one-liner assumes that you are strictly following the tutorial, and have not set ACCEPT_KEYWORDS="~x86" in /etc/make.conf . It also assumes that you are comfortable with the "extreme" optimised CFLAGS in the edited make.conf, not the milder version.

Remember to replace the "pentium" in "-mtune=pentium" with your own processor type!

Here's the super duper stage 1-on-3 NPTL-enabled turbo-charged one-liner:
(reminder: have you edited /etc/locales.build ?)
Code:
env-update && source /etc/profile && emerge -C linux-headers && emerge linux26-headers && emerge gcc-config glibc binutils gcc && sed "s/^CFLAGS=\"-O2/CFLAGS=\"-O3 -mtune=pentium -fforce-addr -momit-leaf-frame-pointer -fomit-frame-pointer -ftracer/;s/^CXXFLAGS.*}/& -fvisibility-inlines-hidden/" -i /etc/make.conf && gcc-config 2 && env-update && source /etc/profile && emerge glibc binutils gcc portage && emerge -e system && emerge syslog-ng xinetd grub vixie-cron reiserfsprogs sysfsutils udev dhcpcd hotplug coldplug gentoolkit && emerge --nodeps acpid ntp && for x in syslog-ng net.eth0 vixie-cron xinetd sshd hotplug coldplug acpid ntp-client ; do rc-update add $x default ; done && ntpdate -b -u pool.ntp.org && emerge gentoo-dev-sources && rm /usr/src/linux && cd /usr/src && ln -s linux-2.6.10-gentoo-r2 linux

Now, you can continue from step 8.3, configuration of udev. :D


Part 2: Using dispatch-conf


dispatch-conf is a superior program for updating configuration files. man dispatch-conf (once your system is fully installed!) will give more details.

EDIT: Since someone has already spilled half of the beans 2 posts after me, I shall reveal the full details here.

All this is to be done when you are ready to update your configuration files, which means anytime from after "emerge splashutils" to before "rebooting the system".

  1. emerge rcs
  2. Create the /etc/config-archive directory.
    Code:
    mkdir /etc/config-archive

  3. Edit /etc/dispatch-conf.conf and change the options as you like. Here's mine:
    Code:
    $ cat /etc/dispatch-conf.conf
    #
    # dispatch-conf.conf
    #

    # Directory to archive replaced configs
    archive-dir=/etc/config-archive

    # Use rcs for storing files in the archive directory?
    # (yes or no)
    # This requires rcs to be emerged beforehand, of course.
    use-rcs=yes

    # Diff for display
    diff="diff -Nu %s %s"

    # Pager for diff display
    pager="less --no-init --QUIT-AT-EOF"

    # Automerge files comprising only CVS interpolations (e.g. Header or Id)
    # (yes or no)
    replace-cvs=yes

    # Automerge files comprising only whitespace and/or comments
    # (yes or no)
    replace-wscomments=yes

    # Automerge files that the user hasn't modified
    # (yes or no)
    replace-unmodified=yes

    # Per-session log file of changes made to configuration files
    #log-file=/var/log/dispatch-conf.log

  4. Run dispatch-conf



Part 3: Using etc-update


For those who still wish to use etc-update, edit /etc/etc-update.conf to customise this poor program as much as you like. Here's mine, edited to make etc-update use the dialog-driven menu-based interface:
Code:
$ cat /etc/etc-update.conf
# edit the lines below to your liking
# $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo-src/portage/cnf/etc-update.conf,v 1.5.2.1 2004/10/22 16:53:30 carpaski Exp $

# mode - 0 for text, 1 for menu (support incomplete)
# note that you need dev-util/dialog installed
mode="1"

# Whether trivial/comment changes should be automerged
eu_automerge="yes"

# arguments used whenever rm is called
rm_opts="-i"

# arguments used whenever mv is called
mv_opts="-i"

# arguments used whenever cp is called
cp_opts="-i"

# pager for use with diff commands (see NOTE_2)
pager="less"
#pager=""

# vim-users: you CAN use vimdiff for diff_command. (see NOTE_1)
diff_command="diff -uN %file1 %file2"
using_editor=0
#diff_command="vim -d %file1 %file2"
#using_editor=1


# vim-users: don't use vimdiff for merging (see NOTE_1)
merge_command="sdiff -s -o %merged %orig %new"

# EXPLANATION
#
# pager:
#
# Examples of pager usage:
#       pager=""                # don't use a pager
#       pager="less -E" # less
#       pager="more"    # more
#
#
# diff_command:
#
# Arguments:
#       %file1  [REQUIRED]
#       %file2  [REQUIRED]
#
# Examples of diff_command:
#       diff_command="diff -uN %file1 %file2"   # diff
#       diff_command="vim -d %file1 %file2"             # vimdiff
#
#
# merge_command:
#
# Arguments:
#       %orig   [REQUIRED]
#   %new    [REQUIRED]
#       %merged [REQUIRED]
#
# Examples of merge_command:
#       merge_command="sdiff -s -o %merged %old %new"   # sdiff
#

# NOTE_1: Editors such as vim/vimdiff are not usable for the merge_command
# because it is not known what filenames the produced files have (the user can
# choose while using those programs)

# NOTE_2: Make sure pager is set to "" when using an editor as diff_command!



Part 4: Using screen to preserve running emerges, your privacy and yesterday's pizza


4.1 >>> Blah, blah, blah

(OK, I admit screen can't preserve pizza. But hey, it still is useful.)

I am wondering why screen does not even get an honourable mention in this tutorial, although ali3nx mentioned it as being very useful. I agree wholeheartedly with him, IMO, screen is really, truly one of the top 10 most useful linux programs. I will let him explain what it is:

ali3nx wrote:

Why use Screen Before Installing and Starting Screen
--------------------------------------------------------------
Screen could be described as a terminal emulator... or maybe a multi user terminal. More than one user can join an ssh session simultaneously with very little frustration making those moments when assistance would be super benificial all that more easy to accomplish. I prefer it best for "holding" a terminal open while your not actually even connected to the tty that you started when screen was executed or for having more than one user join a common workspace inside a linux system. If your following me this has some very good advantages while your installing gentoo. One major advantage is if your disconnected your running compile will not fail or halt but rather continue while your have gone off to eat hotdogs and drink beer over the football game or to have an experienced user help you throught the course of an installation. ...

To start screen type "screen" at the command prompt and continute with your work. should you need to "disconnect from screen to use irc with irssi simply type ctrl+a+d. To re-attach to screen type "screen -x" Sure beats logging off and killing your compile by accident =]

Users of screen are not afraid of their emerge being interrupted, either by pressing CTRL + C accidentally or their kids banging on the keyboard while they're in the kitchen making coffee. As long as screen is detached or locked, nothing short of a hardware failure or power outage will interrupt any programs running within it. :D


4.2 >>> Get screen up and Kicking

For best results, start screen as the very, very first command after the liveCD has booted up successfully.
Code:
# screen


screen will start up and retreat quietly to the background, and you will get back a # prompt. You can now proceed normally with the rest of the install. But if you want to know what difference starting screen will make, read on.

To make screen useful, press CTRL + a , ? (that is, press CTRL + a followed by SHIFT + /) for a help page listing some of the things it can do.

Keep in mind that the console window you get right after starting screen is window number 0.


4.3 >>> Honest cheat sheet

However, even I have found the help page a bit cryptic at times, so here it is, the screen cheat sheet, courtesy of kimchi_sg

For brevity's sake, only the options and shortcuts most useful for the liveCD install environment are mentioned.

Caution: If you wish to use the "Lock screen" function, make sure you have assigned root a password before using the function.
Code:
# passwd
Otherwise, you will be locked out of your install - not a fun way to end it! :roll: This is because the default root password on the liveCD is randomly generated.

4.3.1 >>> Shortcut keys inside of screen

TO ACTIVATE A FUNCTION, PRESS CTRL + A (or CTRL + a), THEN PRESS THE LISTED KEY
KEYS ARE CASE SENSITIVE, a and A do not do the same thing

Quote:

(CTRL + A +) Key - Function

? - Help screen
x - Lock screen, requires root password to unlock ( WARNING! MAKE SURE YOU HAVE SET A PASSWORD FOR ROOT BEFORE USING THIS! )
c - Create a new console window
" - List of all console windows
CTRL + a - Switch to the most recently used window before this one
Numbers from 0 to 9 - Switch to the window of that number. The first window when you start screen is window 0.

d - Detach screen. Makes it "minimised", and returns to the original root prompt you had before starting screen.

[ - Enter text copying mode. Use the arrow keys to move the cursor to the starting point of the text to be copied, and press Enter to mark the starting point of the selection. Use arrow keys to extend the selection. When you are done, press Enter again to copy the selection into the buffer (the "clipboard").
] - Paste the buffer contents at where the cursor is.



4.3.2 >>> Options for starting screen (command-line options)

Quote:

-r Reattaches a detached screen. In other words, the detached screen is made active again.
-RD Most useful for those installing Gentoo over ssh. This will detach screen on the remote system (the one you're installing on) and re-attach it on the local system (the one you're watching the install on).
-x Attach to a non-detached screen. (Multi-display mode)



4.4 >>> Doing the unimaginable - or, exiting screen

There is really no need to terminate screen (I'm not referring to detaching it, but to closing or "exiting" it totally). It will handle all commands silently and invisibly, and springs to attention only when you press CTRL + A followed by any of its shortcut keys.

You can shutdown your computer from within screen. It will exit cleanly, leaving no errors.

But if you really want to close screen, just close all of its windows (use CTRL + a, " to track them down) by typing exit at the prompt in each window.
_________________
Murphy's Law of Gentoo installation: If a compile can fail, it will.

MacGillicuddy's Corollary: At the most inopportune time.

Please search and read the FAQs before posting.


Last edited by kimchi_sg on Wed Mar 09, 2005 3:27 am; edited 17 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ronvenema
Apprentice
Apprentice


Joined: 16 Jan 2005
Posts: 160
Location: Dewey, Az

PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2005 6:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I should have explained that you are absolutely right about the ccache being advantageous only after the code was already compiled once. The time savings was realized on the second and subsequent compilings of kde and other programs. I wish that I had benchmarked the difference but at the onset I was skeptical about the usefulness of using the program.
_________________
Frustration leads to knowledge.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ephilli2
n00b
n00b


Joined: 18 Sep 2004
Posts: 27

PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2005 8:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What's the deal with dispatch-conf? The first thing I do after a fresh install is emerge rcs and colordiff. I then set up dispatch-conf to use them. I think my initial problems when I first started using gentoo were mainly the result of me clobbering config files by using etc-update.
_________________
Dell 600m Pentium M 1.5 Ghz, 512MB, 40GB, ATI M9
Stage 1 on 3, NPTL, GCC 3.4.3, 2.6.11-love1, Reiser 4
www.robotskirts.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bob P
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 20 Oct 2004
Posts: 3355
Location: Jackass! Development Labs

PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2005 11:21 pm    Post subject: Re: Return of the one one-liner! And other tricks Reply with quote

kimchi_sg wrote:
Here's the super duper bootstrappy stage 1-on-3 NPTL-enabled turbo-charged one-liner:
(reminder: have you edited /etc/locales.build ?)
Code:
env-update && source /etc/profile && emerge -C linux-headers && emerge linux26-headers && emerge gcc-config glibc binutils gcc && sed "s/^CFLAGS=\"-O2/CFLAGS=\"-O3 -mtune=pentium -fforce-addr -momit-leaf-frame-pointer -fomit-frame-pointer -ftracer/;s/^CXXFLAGS.*}/& -fvisibility-inlines-hidden/" -i /etc/make.conf && gcc-config 2 && env-update && source /etc/profile && emerge glibc binutils gcc portage && emerge -e system && emerge syslog-ng xinetd grub vixie-cron reiserfsprogs sysfsutils udev dhcpcd hotplug coldplug gentoolkit && emerge --nodeps acpid ntp && for x in syslog-ng net.eth0 vixie-cron xinetd sshd hotplug coldplug acpid ntp-client ; do rc-update $x ; done && ntpdate -b -u pool.ntp.org && emerge gentoo-dev-sources && rm /usr/src/linux && cd /usr/src && ln -s linux-2.6.10-gentoo-r2 linux

Now, you can continue from step 8.3, configuration of udev. :D

bootstrap? technically, we never bootstrap since we started with a stage 3 tarball. i'm sure that you understand this, but i thought i'd point this out in case there's someone less experienced who gets confused by this: for the record, we don't bootstrap in using this installation method.

regarding the automation, i guess it was only a matter of time before somebody suggested a way to re-join the 3 separate steps and make a one-liner out of them. i was thinking that you could accomplish the same thing by making a "make.conf.343" file and using a command like " && cp /etc/make.conf.343 /etc/make.conf &&" within the one-liner as a substitute for Step 2 to join Steps 1 and 3 if you really wanted to rejoin the three steps to automate the process. i think that this approach would be a little easier for most people to follow than editing the individual CFLAG statements as part of a command line structure. but your method is cool, in a very hardcore geek sort of way. :wink:


regarding dispatch-conf, i think dispatch conf is a great option for people that are willing to learn how to use it, but i really haven't given any thought to making it part of the Guide.
_________________
.
Stage 1/3 | Jackass! | Rockhopper! | Thanks | Google Sucks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kimchi_sg
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 26 Nov 2004
Posts: 2915
Location: Singapore

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2005 12:01 am    Post subject: Re: Return of the one one-liner! And other tricks Reply with quote

Bob P wrote:
bootstrap? technically, we never bootstrap since we started with a stage 3 tarball.

The original post has been edited to remove potential confusion. :)

Also, CFLAGS post on page 2 edited to remove some controversal flags.
Bob P wrote:
regarding the automation, i guess it was only a matter of time before somebody suggested a way to re-join the 3 separate steps and make a one-liner out of them. i was thinking that you could accomplish the same thing by making a "make.conf.343" file and using a command like " && cp /etc/make.conf.343 /etc/make.conf &&" within the one-liner as a substitute for Step 2 to join Steps 1 and 3 if you really wanted to rejoin the three steps to automate the process. i think that this approach would be a little easier for most people to follow than editing the individual CFLAG statements as part of a command line structure. but your method is cool, in a very hardcore geek sort of way. :wink:

You didn't comment on the easing up on repetitive rc-update commands using for loop. It seems you copied that one-liner from ali3nx, whom I suspect (despite his "NPTL on stage 1" wisdom) is not a bash scripter at all.

P.S. It really is a torture to type in 9 rc-update commands consecutively with only changes in the service name. Please consider replacing the separate rc-update commands with the for loop.

More from the "foolish changes to the tutorial" department:
If you move all the editing of make.conf, locales.build ( both in /etc ), package.keywords and package.use ( both in /etc/portage ) to just BEFORE chrooting, you can extend my one-liner to cover ALL the steps from after "chroot" to "updating the kernel symlink". ;)

Bob P wrote:
regarding dispatch-conf, i think dispatch conf is a great option for people that are willing to learn how to use it, but i really haven't given any thought to making it part of the Guide.

That's really bad. Theoretically, with dispatch-conf, you will never lose a config file again. :P

But for those dyed-in-the-wool etc-update users, I have not forgotten you. I've inserted a part on tweaking etc-update. ;)
_________________
Murphy's Law of Gentoo installation: If a compile can fail, it will.

MacGillicuddy's Corollary: At the most inopportune time.

Please search and read the FAQs before posting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
slycordinator
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 31 Jan 2004
Posts: 3065
Location: Korea

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2005 4:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bob P wrote:
slycordinator wrote:
That clearly doesn't work. Which means your assumption was false.

that's a nice example of applying basic symbolic logic to real life thinking. :wink:


Yep. I love reducing things to just that.

That's one of the many reasons I'm a geek.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Infra
Tux's lil' helper
Tux's lil' helper


Joined: 12 Jul 2002
Posts: 131
Location: Vantaa, Finland

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2005 9:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm testing this on AMD64 arch now, i'll post my results when it's ready.
_________________
If it works don't mess with it
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bob P
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 20 Oct 2004
Posts: 3355
Location: Jackass! Development Labs

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2005 2:01 pm    Post subject: Re: Return of the one one-liner! And other tricks Reply with quote

kimchi_sg wrote:
Bob P wrote:
regarding the automation, i guess it was only a matter of time before somebody suggested a way to re-join the 3 separate steps and make a one-liner out of them. i was thinking that you could accomplish the same thing by making a "make.conf.343" file and using a command like " && cp /etc/make.conf.343 /etc/make.conf &&" within the one-liner as a substitute for Step 2 to join Steps 1 and 3 if you really wanted to rejoin the three steps to automate the process. i think that this approach would be a little easier for most people to follow than editing the individual CFLAG statements as part of a command line structure. but your method is cool, in a very hardcore geek sort of way. :wink:

You didn't comment on the easing up on repetitive rc-update commands using for loop. It seems you copied that one-liner from ali3nx, whom I suspect (despite his "NPTL on stage 1" wisdom) is not a bash scripter at all.

yes, the rc-update commands do bear a more than coincidental resemblance to the ali3nx Stage 1 install Guide. :wink: as i had mentioned in the intro to the Stage 1/3 Guide, i protyped my installation method to build a system that would have similar functionality (ie: emerges the same basic system programs) to his Stage 1 install, but added the improved performance an optimized toolkit and the added robustness of building upon a Stage 3 tarball. so yes, in a fit of laziness, the repetitive rc-update commands were lifted almost directly from his install guide.

i really do like your for loop. :cool: it addresses the update problem in an elegant way, and it will definitely find its way into the guide. insofar as this is an advanced installation method, i like the idea of using advanced shell techniques. :wink: but because the guide has become a n00b magnet, i don't think it would be a great idea to completely remove the redundant commands, as they make it very clear to the less sophisticated user what is going on. i think that i will provide the for loop as a 3rd alternative. its great code, and i think that its one of the coolest additions to the guide that have been suggested so far. :idea:

Quote:
P.S. It really is a torture to type in 9 rc-update commands consecutively with only changes in the service name. Please consider replacing the separate rc-update commands with the for loop.

well, it is torture if your're typing a one-liner, but its very easy if you're typing at the bash prompt using the up-arrow key, so that you only have to change the service name. for those who prefer the one-liner approach, the for loop is a very nice idea.
_________________
.
Stage 1/3 | Jackass! | Rockhopper! | Thanks | Google Sucks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bob P
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 20 Oct 2004
Posts: 3355
Location: Jackass! Development Labs

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2005 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kimchi_sg wrote:
More from the "foolish changes to the tutorial" department:
If you move all the editing of make.conf, locales.build ( both in /etc ), package.keywords and package.use ( both in /etc/portage ) to just BEFORE chrooting, you can extend my one-liner to cover ALL the steps from after "chroot" to "updating the kernel symlink". ;)

well, if we decide to go that route, we're talking about changing the focal point of the guide; right now the focus of the guide is to educate people on how to rebuild their toolkit and their system files. as part of that objective, the guide is written in a logical order that is easy for the user to follow. if we change the focus of the guide so that it is primarily based on performing an unattended installation, then the guide will become somewhat less intuitive and somewhat harder to follow. that is not necessarily a bad thing. i'll have to think about it a little. have you given any thought to just writing a big bash script that completely installs Gentoo for us once you've booted the Live CD? :twisted:

i really won't have alot of time to do a major revision to the guide until the tax season is over here in the U.S. i have a couple of complete system rebuilds scheduled to take place after the tax season, and that would provide a great opportunity to revise the installation method and update the guide.
_________________
.
Stage 1/3 | Jackass! | Rockhopper! | Thanks | Google Sucks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kimchi_sg
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 26 Nov 2004
Posts: 2915
Location: Singapore

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2005 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

More magic on its way... The post at the top of this page has been updated massively to include the usage of screen (IMO, one of the 10 wonders of the GNU/linux world :P) in the install process. :D

Bob P wrote:
have you given any thought to just writing a big bash script that completely installs Gentoo for us once you've booted the Live CD? :twisted:

I might just get around to writing an install script that takes care of everything. I just might. Maybe it should be called G.L.I.S. 2. :twisted:

But alas, my exams are coming up in a month's time. :(
_________________
Murphy's Law of Gentoo installation: If a compile can fail, it will.

MacGillicuddy's Corollary: At the most inopportune time.

Please search and read the FAQs before posting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bob P
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 20 Oct 2004
Posts: 3355
Location: Jackass! Development Labs

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2005 7:30 pm    Post subject: Re: Return of the one one-liner! And other tricks Reply with quote

kimchi_sg wrote:
I am wondering why screen does not even get an honourable mention in this tutorial, although ali3nx mentioned it as being very useful. I agree wholeheartedly with him, IMO, screen is really, truly one of the top 10 most useful linux programs.

screen is good if you need it, but as i was writing the Guide i really didn't think that the average user performing a Gentoo install really needs it to complete a successful installation.

sure, creen is great if you're using ssh to hook up to a remote PC and you want to perform remote administration, but i didn't think that was the typical situation for a Gentoo user performing an install.

again, the focus of this Guide is limited to how to rebuild an optimized toolkit on top of a very stable Gentoo base system. its not really about all of the other cool things that can be done with linux.
_________________
.
Stage 1/3 | Jackass! | Rockhopper! | Thanks | Google Sucks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Infra
Tux's lil' helper
Tux's lil' helper


Joined: 12 Jul 2002
Posts: 131
Location: Vantaa, Finland

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2005 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay,

I have finished the installation with my 64bit Dual Xeon, and it's working great.

So this guide is working great for amd64, ofcourse you won't have to use "unstable" branch. With amd64 it's just pain in the a** :)

Thanks Bob for this great guide, i'm going to use this in future also.
_________________
If it works don't mess with it
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kimchi_sg
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 26 Nov 2004
Posts: 2915
Location: Singapore

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2005 11:35 pm    Post subject: Re: Return of the one one-liner! And other tricks Reply with quote

Bob P wrote:
again, the focus of this Guide is limited to how to rebuild an optimized toolkit on top of a very stable Gentoo base system. its not really about all of the other cool things that can be done with linux.

True, but just as a good movie has to be watched with a big bucket of popcorn and a giant coke to boot, so a good install method should be accompanied by some frills to make it easier. :D

I've put a big "Optional" header there, to remind people of the "Extra"-ness of these things. Yes, even the usage of dispatch-conf. :P
Bob P wrote:
sure, screen is great if you're using ssh to hook up to a remote PC and you want to perform remote administration, but i didn't think that was the typical situation for a Gentoo user performing an install.

It is great not only for that purpose... but I shall not drag the debate further. :)

I was trying in my post to highlight those features that would work great even on non-remote installations, hence the title of that section.
_________________
Murphy's Law of Gentoo installation: If a compile can fail, it will.

MacGillicuddy's Corollary: At the most inopportune time.

Please search and read the FAQs before posting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bob P
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 20 Oct 2004
Posts: 3355
Location: Jackass! Development Labs

PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2005 1:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kimchi_sg wrote:
I might just get around to writing an install script that takes care of everything. I just might. Maybe it should be called G.L.I.S. 2. :twisted:

But alas, my exams are coming up in a month's time. :(

yes, time is our worst enemy. you know, it would really be cool to have one big bash script that you could just cut and paste to do the entire installation. it wouldn't be as readable as the guide, but it would be very cool. :cool:

btw, the Guide now has both ccache and the for loop. :wink:
_________________
.
Stage 1/3 | Jackass! | Rockhopper! | Thanks | Google Sucks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kimchi_sg
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 26 Nov 2004
Posts: 2915
Location: Singapore

PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2005 3:26 am    Post subject: for loop mistake Reply with quote

Gahhh!!! Just spotted the killer mistake in my for loop! It should read
Code:
do rc-update add $x default
instead of
Code:
do rc-update $x
:oops:
The original post has been updated.

(File this in the "Growing pains of a budding bash scripter" file... :( )
_________________
Murphy's Law of Gentoo installation: If a compile can fail, it will.

MacGillicuddy's Corollary: At the most inopportune time.

Please search and read the FAQs before posting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bob P
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 20 Oct 2004
Posts: 3355
Location: Jackass! Development Labs

PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2005 1:03 pm    Post subject: Re: for loop mistake Reply with quote

kimchi_sg wrote:
Gahhh!!! Just spotted the killer mistake in my for loop! It should read
Code:
do rc-update add $x default

i thought it looked funny without the default runlevel statement, but i have to admit, i didn't actually try it. i hate typos. :(
_________________
.
Stage 1/3 | Jackass! | Rockhopper! | Thanks | Google Sucks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bob P
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 20 Oct 2004
Posts: 3355
Location: Jackass! Development Labs

PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2005 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Infra wrote:
I have finished the installation with my 64bit Dual Xeon, and it's working great.

So this guide is working great for amd64, ofcourse you won't have to use "unstable" branch.

this makes me wonder if most of the develpers are using AMD 64 boxen. :!:
_________________
.
Stage 1/3 | Jackass! | Rockhopper! | Thanks | Google Sucks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kimchi_sg
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 26 Nov 2004
Posts: 2915
Location: Singapore

PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2005 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bob P wrote:
this makes me wonder if most of the develpers are using AMD 64 boxen. :!:

Or maybe the AMD64 devs are just quicker to unmask packages into the stable branch. 8)
_________________
Murphy's Law of Gentoo installation: If a compile can fail, it will.

MacGillicuddy's Corollary: At the most inopportune time.

Please search and read the FAQs before posting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DrWoland
l33t
l33t


Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 603

PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2005 3:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So... another success :P I think NOW I have my system just how I want it.
_________________
I'm not a Guru, I just ask a lot of questions.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kimchi_sg
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 26 Nov 2004
Posts: 2915
Location: Singapore

PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2005 5:26 pm    Post subject: 2005.0 ready? Reply with quote

@Bob P:

Just a passing thought: Will you be updating this guide as and when 2005.0 becomes available?

It seems that the final release will almost certainly be ready in a couple of weeks from now at the very latest. I'm expecting it not more than 7 days from now. :D If not for the show-stopper security bugs which prompted a "security rebuild", we'd all be downloading 2005.0 liveCD ISOs by now. :P

You may want to put off some of the system rebuilds to test out the effect of the changes in 2005.0 on the install tutorial. With kernel 2.6 sources and headers becoming the default almost everywhere, this will be a exciting time on the Gentoo battlefront. :)
_________________
Murphy's Law of Gentoo installation: If a compile can fail, it will.

MacGillicuddy's Corollary: At the most inopportune time.

Please search and read the FAQs before posting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mridle
n00b
n00b


Joined: 09 Mar 2005
Posts: 8
Location: denmark

PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2005 8:51 pm    Post subject: mtab Reply with quote

Hi Bob

Been using Gentoo for several months now and was feeling like upgrading gcc - so I printed your excellent guide and had fun rebuilding my system. However, I was unable to boot my system afterwards. As suggested in another thread I copied over /proc/mounts to /etc mtab, which solved the problem. I don't know if it's a general problem, or it was just my kernel/system that was tricky - but maybe a heads up in the guide would be nice.

Apart from that, I now have a great running system including X and all the apps I would ever want.

/idle
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kimchi_sg
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 26 Nov 2004
Posts: 2915
Location: Singapore

PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2005 12:12 am    Post subject: Re: mtab Reply with quote

mridle wrote:
I printed your excellent guide and had fun rebuilding my system. However, I was unable to boot my system afterwards. As suggested in another thread I copied over /proc/mounts to /etc mtab, which solved the problem. I don't know if it's a general problem, or it was just my kernel/system that was tricky - but maybe a heads up in the guide would be nice.

I concur. The x86 baselayout is to blame, it seems.

If using all unstable packages, this problem does not happen, but it happened to me too on my last install, when I decided to stick with the stable branch for the very first time. :(
_________________
Murphy's Law of Gentoo installation: If a compile can fail, it will.

MacGillicuddy's Corollary: At the most inopportune time.

Please search and read the FAQs before posting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mridle
n00b
n00b


Joined: 09 Mar 2005
Posts: 8
Location: denmark

PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2005 8:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

oh - so the secret to a stable system is to choose the unstable branch 8O

Well it's not really a big problem - when you find out what's wrong. But I'll admit, that I got a little worried that I somehow had borked my partitions, when it failed booting...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kimchi_sg
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 26 Nov 2004
Posts: 2915
Location: Singapore

PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2005 10:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mridle wrote:
oh - so the secret to a stable system is to choose the unstable branch

Says who?

The moral of the story: ~x86 may be as good as x86 some of the time, and x86 is better than ~x86 most of the time. I have digressed enough. :P
_________________
Murphy's Law of Gentoo installation: If a compile can fail, it will.

MacGillicuddy's Corollary: At the most inopportune time.

Please search and read the FAQs before posting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Master One
l33t
l33t


Joined: 25 Aug 2003
Posts: 754
Location: Austria

PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2005 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kimchi_sg wrote:
mridle wrote:
oh - so the secret to a stable system is to choose the unstable branch

Says who? The moral of the story: ~x86 may be as good as x86 some of the time, and x86 is better than ~x86 most of the time. I have digressed enough. :P

I think, it's generally better to stick with x86, and to only fetch needed packages (like the actual baselayout) from the ~x86 branch. Those packages to put with "=" and version-number into /etc/portage/package.keywords (like I did with the toolkit packages), so if it's working this way, you will not have to care until the next x86 release of these packages (otherwise you most likely will have to follow a lot of updates in the ~x86 branch, until the next x86 release).
_________________
Las torturas mentales de la CIA
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic    Gentoo Forums Forum Index Documentation, Tips & Tricks All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18  Next
Page 14 of 18

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum