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Jjuulliiaann
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2005 3:03 am    Post subject: Do I NEED To Partition? Reply with quote

If I am installing on an external drive with some data already on it and only one partition, do I absolutely need to create multiple partitions?
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JoseJX
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2005 6:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's hard to say, you didn't really supply much information.

What filesystem is this external disk formatted with?
Do you have a swap partition already?
Do you have a bootstrap partition already?
Is this external disk your only linux install on the machine?

The more you tell us, the more we can help you! :)
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fb
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2005 7:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If I understand well what you are doing: Yes.
You have your main hard drive with OS X and you have
this external drive on which you have data (usable by OS X)
and you want linux to live on this drive. That way your OS X
drive is undisturbed.
If you want to use have OS X data and Linux on the external
drive, you will need to partition. In fact you will need to partition
anyway. You usually run linux with at least two partitions:
*one called root (/) which basically contains the OS, applications
and user files.
*another called swap which serve as virtual memory and is traditionnally
twice as big as your RAM.

It is also usually recommended, but not compulsory, to separate the /home
directory (which contains users files, the equivalent of /Users in OS X) on a
separate partition. I personnally do it. It is not a subsitute to back up but you
can trash and re-install your system from scratch without having to erase your
files.

Anything beyond that is the stuff of specialist with special configurations
in mind.

In your case your external drive probably should have 4 partitions:
-one for OS X stuff you want to store there.
-one root partition for linux
-one swap partition for linux
-one /home partition (optional)

There are several file system available on linux, ppc people usually go with ext2/ext3
filesystem. One of the advantage of this filesystem is that there are tools for accessing
them from OS X if I remember well. They are also well tested. (the swap partition is of
a special type called "swap").

I hope you can make sense of this. Don't hesitate to ask more question here.

Francois
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Jjuulliiaann
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2005 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

fb wrote:
If I understand well what you are doing: Yes.
You have your main hard drive with OS X and you have
this external drive on which you have data (usable by OS X)
and you want linux to live on this drive. That way your OS X
drive is undisturbed.
If you want to use have OS X data and Linux on the external
drive, you will need to partition. In fact you will need to partition
anyway. You usually run linux with at least two partitions:
*one called root (/) which basically contains the OS, applications
and user files.
*another called swap which serve as virtual memory and is traditionnally
twice as big as your RAM.

It is also usually recommended, but not compulsory, to separate the /home
directory (which contains users files, the equivalent of /Users in OS X) on a
separate partition. I personnally do it. It is not a subsitute to back up but you
can trash and re-install your system from scratch without having to erase your
files.

Anything beyond that is the stuff of specialist with special configurations
in mind.

In your case your external drive probably should have 4 partitions:
-one for OS X stuff you want to store there.
-one root partition for linux
-one swap partition for linux
-one /home partition (optional)

There are several file system available on linux, ppc people usually go with ext2/ext3
filesystem. One of the advantage of this filesystem is that there are tools for accessing
them from OS X if I remember well. They are also well tested. (the swap partition is of
a special type called "swap").

I hope you can make sense of this. Don't hesitate to ask more question here.

Francois
Yes, I understand what you are saying. You got it exactly right!
So my external HD is about 55 GB and I've used about 20 already. I want about 15 more on there for OS X data, so that would leave me with 20 GB. So:
1. 35 GB for OS X data
2. 2 GB Swap Partition for Linux
3. 20 GB root/home partition for Linux

Sound good?
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Jjuulliiaann
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2005 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

fb wrote:
If I understand well what you are doing: Yes.
You have your main hard drive with OS X and you have
this external drive on which you have data (usable by OS X)
and you want linux to live on this drive. That way your OS X
drive is undisturbed.
If you want to use have OS X data and Linux on the external
drive, you will need to partition. In fact you will need to partition
anyway. You usually run linux with at least two partitions:
*one called root (/) which basically contains the OS, applications
and user files.
*another called swap which serve as virtual memory and is traditionnally
twice as big as your RAM.

It is also usually recommended, but not compulsory, to separate the /home
directory (which contains users files, the equivalent of /Users in OS X) on a
separate partition. I personnally do it. It is not a subsitute to back up but you
can trash and re-install your system from scratch without having to erase your
files.

Anything beyond that is the stuff of specialist with special configurations
in mind.

In your case your external drive probably should have 4 partitions:
-one for OS X stuff you want to store there.
-one root partition for linux
-one swap partition for linux
-one /home partition (optional)

There are several file system available on linux, ppc people usually go with ext2/ext3
filesystem. One of the advantage of this filesystem is that there are tools for accessing
them from OS X if I remember well. They are also well tested. (the swap partition is of
a special type called "swap").

I hope you can make sense of this. Don't hesitate to ask more question here.

Francois
What filesystems do I need for these partitions. I know that I need HFS+ for the OS X data, but what about the others? UNIX Filesystem.
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fb
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2005 9:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jjuulliiaann wrote:
What filesystems do I need for these partitions. I know that I need HFS+ for the OS X data, but what about the others? UNIX Filesystem.


I recommend that you use ext3. The "native" filesystem for linux is ext2, ext3 is an ext2 filesystem
with some journaling add on for speedy recovery (ie it can be mounted and wrote on as an ext2
filesytem). There are other filesystems out there but some of them are not that stable on ppc so
you should probably stick with it. The swap partition is of the special type "linux swap".
Your partitionning scheme looks all right. While traditionnally the recipe for swap is twice your
amount of RAM there is a limit to its usefullness and applicability. 1GB for the swap should be enough
and the rest for your root.

You may want to back up your OSX data before repartitionning. Resizing a partition, well shrinking
a partition especially, is a risky buisness. I know you have a lot of stuff there but better safe than
sorry. If you resize, rather than erase/recreate, it is a good idea to do some kind of defragmentation
before hand to put everything at the begining of the partition.

Francois
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Jjuulliiaann
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2005 11:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

fb wrote:
Jjuulliiaann wrote:
What filesystems do I need for these partitions. I know that I need HFS+ for the OS X data, but what about the others? UNIX Filesystem.


I recommend that you use ext3. The "native" filesystem for linux is ext2, ext3 is an ext2 filesystem
with some journaling add on for speedy recovery (ie it can be mounted and wrote on as an ext2
filesytem). There are other filesystems out there but some of them are not that stable on ppc so
you should probably stick with it. The swap partition is of the special type "linux swap".
Your partitionning scheme looks all right. While traditionnally the recipe for swap is twice your
amount of RAM there is a limit to its usefullness and applicability. 1GB for the swap should be enough
and the rest for your root.

You may want to back up your OSX data before repartitionning. Resizing a partition, well shrinking
a partition especially, is a risky buisness. I know you have a lot of stuff there but better safe than
sorry. If you resize, rather than erase/recreate, it is a good idea to do some kind of defragmentation
before hand to put everything at the begining of the partition.

Francois
I don't think that ext3 is an option in apple's disk utility. How do I partition it that way?
Yeah, I'll back up. And I'll take 1GB off of my OS X data partition so I can add 1 GB to the Swap Space partition. Do the partitions need to have specific names or anything?
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fb
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2005 12:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jjuulliiaann wrote:
I don't think that ext3 is an option in apple's disk utility. How do I partition it that way?
Yeah, I'll back up. And I'll take 1GB off of my OS X data partition so I can add 1 GB to the Swap Space partition. Do the partitions need to have specific names or anything?

ext3 is indeed not an option from disk utilities of mac OSX. You cannot create it from OSX as far
as I know.
The standard procedure used to be as follow:
*in OSX create or resize the OSX partition
*create a big partition for linux with nothing on it.
*boot linux (from the cd)
*create the linux partitions from linux.

Nowadays the linux disk utilities can create and resize HFS+ partitions so you can do it from
linux. Don't expect graphical utility at this stage of the install however.
Have you had a look at the documentation for the installation (http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/handbook-ppc.xml?full=1).
I know it is boring but it pays to read it and that doesn't prevent you from asking questions
afterwards.

Just to make sure everything is understood, your current partition plan is as follow:
1) 35 GB HFS+ (OS X data)
2) 1 GB swap partition for linux
3) all the rest ext3 for linux

For the naming, none of my linux partitions on ppc have a name so I don't think it is
compulsory. Linux has a scheme to identify partitions. Look in the manual under
"preparing the disks".

hope that helps,
Francois
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Jjuulliiaann
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2005 3:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What file system should the swap partition be?
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fb
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2005 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jjuulliiaann wrote:
What file system should the swap partition be?


It should be "linux swap", code "82" if you are using fdisk.
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