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Partioning my new disk on a donated powermac G4
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Clapper
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 22, 2005 6:03 pm    Post subject: Partioning my new disk on a donated powermac G4 Reply with quote

Hello,

I recently was given a Powermac G4 computer. I have never really much cared for the Apple OS9 that came on the machine, and decided it would be neat to put Gentoo on it. I removed the original OS9 drive, and replaced it with a fresh, larger drive.

I have booted off the Gentoo installation CD, and am a little confused about what partitions I must have. I am familiar with the /boot, /root, /swap partitions from other x86 machines I've installed Gentoo on, and I know I'll need to set these up on my drive. I am not planning on running any Apple operating system on the hardware at this point, so I guess I just need to know what I must put on the disk as far as partitions, to make the hardware boot only into Gentoo.

Are the only other partitions I need the Apple_partition_map, and the Apple_Bootstrap ?

Is it important for these two partitions to be the first and second on the hard drive? Do I create any kind of file system on them (the Gentoo docs seemed not to mention any). What goes on these partitions?

Lastly, parted command seems to be on the livecd, but not mac-fdisk (mac-fdisk proprietary?). Any disadvantage to not using mac-fdisk?
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davidgurvich
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 22, 2005 10:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Give the installer from debian/testing a try. Download only the first CD and use it to partition your hard drive. Then you can install gentoo. For what it's worth here is the partition table of my gentoo install after using mac-fdisk
Quote:
/dev/hda
# type name length base ( size ) system
/dev/hda1 Apple_partition_map Apple 63 @ 1 ( 31.5k) Partition map
/dev/hda2 Apple_Bootstrap bootstrap 1600 @ 64 (800.0k) NewWorld bootblock
/dev/hda3 Apple_UNIX_SVR2 swap 4194304 @ 1664 ( 2.0G) Linux swap
/dev/hda4 Apple_UNIX_SVR2 root 115907232 @ 4195968 ( 55.3G) Linux native

Block size=512, Number of Blocks=120103200
DeviceType=0x0, DeviceId=0x0

Afterwards I used debians installer on a different disk and the two seemed similar. The only difference of note was that the partition editor in debians installer was much easier to use.


Last edited by davidgurvich on Sat Dec 24, 2005 2:06 am; edited 1 time in total
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Clapper
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2005 2:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I made the mistake of skipping the "ppc" disk preparation section of the install guide ( I thought it would be the same as the x86), and got everything setup, till I got to the "configure bootloader" section, and realized I may have to start over again, and fix my disk.

I hear parted can resize existing partitions, maybe I'll use that, and fix my installation.

I couldn't figure out what those Apple partitions are for- I guess you don't have to format them, or put any files there, right?
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JoseJX
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Joined: 28 Apr 2002
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2005 6:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Depending on which Apple partitions you're referring to:

The Apple Partition Map is a required partition. It holds the information about the other partitions on the drive.

The Apple Disk Driver partitions are used only in OS9 and can be removed by initializing the disk partition map (with i in mac-fdisk) before partitioning.

The Apple Bootstrap partition is an 800kb partition that contains an HFS filesystem and yaboot. This allows OpenFirmware to boot the machine. It is *not* the same as a boot partition on an x86 machine, you should never need to edit or mount this partition.

Parted can indeed resize existing partitions, it is included on the InstallCDs. davidgurvich, I think this is the same utility that debian uses as well.
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Gentoo PPC FAQ: http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/gentoo-ppc-faq.xml
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davidgurvich
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2005 1:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was just referring to the visual feedback on partition changes and clearer messages about changes. I liked that feature. Also once partitioned you can do a network install of gentoo as debian recognized all my networking options on boot. From personal impressions, gentoo is faster, easier to install newer versions of software, and tends to be more unstable. Not surprising.
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