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Filesystem Raiserfs or XFS on a G5?
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passaro
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Joined: 22 Sep 2006
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Location: Sweden, Helsingborg

PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 1:15 pm    Post subject: Filesystem Raiserfs or XFS on a G5? Reply with quote

This is my first post, anyway.
got the idea of coosing gentoo for my computer after checking with distrowatch (witch is outdated on the gentoo info).
Got a Powermac with 2 G5 processors, havent installd yet.

Some things that i have to figure out first.
1. XFS or RaiserFS is what i realy what to go for.

a) Sins the G5 is a 64bit processor and they are dual then XFS is perfect right (64bit filesystem and simultaniusreadright possibilitys journald)?

b) RaiserFS is grate shit too

But what would give a G5 the best juice?


Andreas
btw, were is the G5 people?
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davidgurvich
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 3:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I haven't had any problems using XFS. But am sure you will get similar message about reiserfs. At any rate I use ext2 boot partition with the rest xfs.
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DrACoNuS
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Due to the heavy caching, invest in a UPS and go with the XFS filesystem, I have had an excellent experience running XFS on my Dual Opteron. I assume you have over 1GB of ram in the G5 XFS will put it to good use with the benefit of increased throughput.
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timotheus25
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 23, 2006 4:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My experience with XFS with the 2.4 kernels, late 2.5 kernels, and early 2.6 kernels was that it caused all sorts of issues with:

  • backup
  • file-system checking
  • data recovery
  • all-around performance
  • 3rd-party closed-source tools (vmware, etc.)

And all of this on a well-tested x86 too. In fact, I switched to JFS for the one partition that I wanted to use many >2 GB files on, with great results.

It is possible that this has changed since the time I abandoned XFS several years ago. I now use reiserfs (not reiser4) for most things, and have no down-time or any of the above issues, and superior performance in many respects.

EDIT: the machine in question had 1300 MHz CPU with 640 MB RAM, top-of-the line in 2000/2001, some time ago now.
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rangerpb
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Joined: 19 Jan 2005
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2006 6:03 pm    Post subject: XFS and yaboot Reply with quote

Just an FYI that the ppc bootloader cannot read into an XFS disk partition. This is important for two reasons:

1. When yaboot is executed, it reads its configuration file from (by default) /etc/yaboot.conf. This means that if /etc lies on an XFS partition it will fail. This can be avoided by having an ext2|3 or fat (god forbid) disk partition with /etc/yaboot.conf on it. You can do some symlink magic to make it appear normally when the system is running too.

2. If /boot, where the kernels are, is on XFS it will not be able to boot either. The same advice holds true for number. Maybe just make /boot as an ext3 disk partition.
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JoseJX
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2006 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's good advice, but it's not quite right. Yaboot can't read from XFS, but it's only a problem for the kernel. yaboot.conf is stored in the bootstrap partition (go ahead, mount it and see, it's just an HFS partition). This is made obvious when you change your /etc/yaboot.conf, but forget to run ybin afterwards and your yaboot changes are not used. :)
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corsair
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

JoseJX wrote:
That's good advice, but it's not quite right. Yaboot can't read from XFS, but it's only a problem for the kernel. yaboot.conf is stored in the bootstrap partition (go ahead, mount it and see, it's just an HFS partition). This is made obvious when you change your /etc/yaboot.conf, but forget to run ybin afterwards and your yaboot changes are not used. :)


yes, that's true for Apple machines. On IBM machines you don't have to do the ybin thing (there is no bootstrap partition). yaboot.conf gets read from the filesystem there. And ranger comes from IBM.. :wink:
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