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posey
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2008 1:48 am    Post subject: share /home with os x? Reply with quote

I have a iBook G3 SE (graphite) 466Mhz, with one USB and one firewire. It has 574MB RAM. It's currently running OS X 10.3, but I'm looking at updating it to 10.4 soon (support for it is dropped in 10.5). In the process I intend to get an 80GB drive so I can dual boot Gentoo.

I'm wondering if I can make /home its own partition and have both Gentoo and OS X use it. I'm also wondering if it would be a good thing to do or if it would cause problems with OS X.

I don't know my way around OS X quite as well as I do with Gentoo. Ideally, I'd be able to easily share files between the two.

I'm hoping the install of everything goes well because I have become a busier student than I would like to be. I can manage without this laptop, but I don't want to set it up in a way that causes known problems because fixing the laptop would be more interesting than schoolwork.

Thanks
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Zepp
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2008 5:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does linux have full support for the mac file system? I don't know if OS X has built-in support for ext3 or the others. As for causing problems, I think you might be ok actually. I can't say for certain though. Most of the configuration files and directories for apple programs are in your Library folder, most of the few .* files I have in my HOME dir are originall unix/linux programs like bashrc and vimrc. Those should be shareable with their linux counter parts.
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fb
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2008 6:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That kind of stuff as been discussed before in this section. The short of it from memory,
you can get a ext2 driver for OSX (I think). Linux will read HFS+ from OSX but had problems
with journaled HFS+ (have to check if it is still the case). Permission and so on work the same
in linux and OSX, so you have to make sure you have the same ID (I mean user number usually
500 for the first user in OSX but gentoo likes to put it to 1000) for both system. You probably
can put it on a separate partitions shared by both system, I would recommend to format it HFS+
but I am not sure how it works under OSX.

Currently on my set up I mount my OSX partition in linux and just have a folder in my home
directory linked to my user directory under OSX. I don't boot OSX very much anymore (and I have
another pure OSX machine in reach if I want to).
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posey
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 8:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I may not have been searching well enough, but I was surprised I didn't find anything on it.

The PPC FAQ page suggests there's a project that does ext2/ext3 support for OS X, but looking at the project it might just be ext2? HFS+ does seem like the smarter way to go.[/topic]

I have no idea how to make OS X go look for /users/me/documents on a different partition though. Although the OS X setup is what I see as being the complicated side anyway. I'm assuming I would want it to mount it under that, because it looks like OS X uses the other folders under /users/me for its stuff.

I haven't done much with HFS+ under linux, and what I did do was with Ubuntu (x86), but it worked well.

I like OS X a lot, and don't want to get rid of it, but I find myself using the iBook thinking "this would be so awesome with Gentoo on it." This is the only mac I have though.
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Zepp
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 11:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found a few methods just by googling how to have the users home directory on separate partition. Among them one suggested the regular /etc/fstab to mount a separate partition to /Users. Might want to take a look.
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Bones McCracker
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2008 5:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Too bad Linux has crappy support for UFS, or that would be another option.
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pizzach
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2008 4:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BoneKracker wrote:
Too bad Linux has crappy support for UFS, or that would be another option.


I would advice against UFS. I remember reading somewhere that it doesn't support fragmenting files which leads to very slow file management. I tried formatting my Mac OS X as it once and it was messy. But it makes a great swap file system.

You could always format the drive as fat32 as the lowest common denominator. :oops:

Another option to try is formatting a partition as the old HFS (non-plus) if linux supports writing it. You can set the User home directories in the "Net info" application on Mac OS X.

You can find a program than input a module into Mac OS X for reading ext2/3 partitions. But I unfortunately have never had any luck writing to such a drive with Mac OS X.
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Zepp
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2008 6:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

pizzach wrote:
BoneKracker wrote:
Too bad Linux has crappy support for UFS, or that would be another option.


I would advice against UFS. I remember reading somewhere that it doesn't support fragmenting files which leads to very slow file management. I tried formatting my Mac OS X as it once and it was messy. But it makes a great swap file system.

You could always format the drive as fat32 as the lowest common denominator. :oops:

Another option to try is formatting a partition as the old HFS (non-plus) if linux supports writing it. You can set the User home directories in the "Net info" application on Mac OS X.

You can find a program than input a module into Mac OS X for reading ext2/3 partitions. But I unfortunately have never had any luck writing to such a drive with Mac OS X.


fat32 does not support file system permissions properly i thought?
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Bones McCracker
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

pizzach wrote:
BoneKracker wrote:
Too bad Linux has crappy support for UFS, or that would be another option.


I would advice against UFS. I remember reading somewhere that it doesn't support fragmenting files which leads to very slow file management. I tried formatting my Mac OS X as it once and it was messy. But it makes a great swap file system.

You could always format the drive as fat32 as the lowest common denominator. :oops:

Another option to try is formatting a partition as the old HFS (non-plus) if linux supports writing it. You can set the User home directories in the "Net info" application on Mac OS X.

You can find a program than input a module into Mac OS X for reading ext2/3 partitions. But I unfortunately have never had any luck writing to such a drive with Mac OS X.


OpenBSD runs on it to this day, so it can't be that inordinately slow. But the point is moot because, as I said, it's not well-supported by Linux (read-only).

All the Microsoft filesystems except ntfs require periodic defragmentation. HFS+ is an excellent filesystem, but it's poorly supported by Linux (in terms of filesystem maintenance tools like fsck). However, since you are dual-booting, you can maintain from the Mac side. So I'd say sharing an HFS+ partition might be the way to go. You might also want to refer to this: http://gentoo-wiki.com/HOWTO_hfsplus
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posey
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2008 12:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

HFS+ sounds like the way to go.

Now I just need the time to install everything.

Thanks
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pizzach
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 1:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zepp wrote:
fat32 does not support file system permissions properly i thought?


You are right. But for a home directory, permissions are not nearly as important. While you're files might not be as protected, they would be viewable on Windows, Mac, and Linux boxes easily. :)

If your actual OS is on FAT32, things become way more complicated. :twisted:
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pizzach
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 1:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BoneKracker wrote:
OpenBSD runs on it to this day, so it can't be that inordinately slow. But the point is moot because, as I said, it's not well-supported by Linux (read-only).


Interesting. It's probably an issue of Apple's implimentation then. the file system not very well supported in the Mac world. I remember Photoshop bawked when it realized it was on a Unix partition stating explicitely that it didn't support it.
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Zepp
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 5:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Weird, you would think they would just use the bsd implementation, not much work.


Anyway ya I suppose its not as big a deal with your home dir. Not journaled and fragments easily though.
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