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mreff555
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2013 8:22 pm    Post subject: whats with the weird name Reply with quote

First off, this is not the first time I've installed gentoo on this laptop. but this is the first time I have ever had trouble with ethernet.

my lspci printout indicates that I have a Atheros 8151 ethernet card. Every article I have found on the internet had led me to believe that atl1e is the correct module for my card.
I tried both built in and as a module. Built in I get nothing, as a module I am able to load it but I still don't have any devices
I tried atl1c. it worked, and I have a working connection but the device name is weird, "enp5s0"

why?

also, I don't totally understand the symlink in /etc/init.d of net.eth0 -> net.lo

rc-status indicates that net.lo is boot and net.eth0 is default. Is this correct?
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NeddySeagoon
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2013 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mreff555,

The weird name for your ethernet is an 'improvement' from udev.
Instead of using the kernel name, which would likely have been eth0, udev now renames the interface from its location in the PCI device tree

The real script, named net.lo runs as whatever its called as, so the symlink net.eth0 -> net.lo makes it run as net.eth0.
It saves having to maintain several copies of the script.

You can put enp5s0 in place of eth0 everywhere on your system and go with the times or there are several methods to tell udev to leave your device names alone.
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mreff555
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 08, 2013 2:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm fine with it, as long as it's supposed to be like that.

now, should every interface have a similar symbolic link pointing to net.lo? eg. my wireless connection?
should each symbolic link be added to rc-update?
should net.lo be in rc-update?
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NeddySeagoon
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 08, 2013 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mreff555,

net.lo should be in the boot runlevel.

The answers to your other questions is 'it depends'.


If your system and its interfaces is fixed, you can use the rc system to start all the interfaces you need. In this case make the symlinks and add them to rc-update.
If you have a laptop and interfaces come and go, you may want something like wicd or NetworkManager. Do not make the symlinks.
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Etal
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 09, 2013 1:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you'd like nicer names (the new names are not easy to remember), you can create a file like this:

Code:
SUBSYSTEM=="net", ACTION=="add", ATTR{address}=="xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx", NAME="em0"
SUBSYSTEM=="net", ACTION=="add", ATTR{address}=="yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy", NAME="wi0"


(filling in your cards' MAC addresses) and drop save to /etc/udev/rules.d/70-my-network.rules

The only caveat is that you can't name them by the kernel names (e.g. eth0).
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mreff555
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 10, 2013 12:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

If your system and its interfaces is fixed, you can use the rc system to start all the interfaces you need. In this case make the symlinks and add them to rc-update.
If you have a laptop and interfaces come and go, you may want something like wicd or NetworkManager. Do not make the symlinks.


You are probably right. I probably should use something like that. but I really really really hate NetworkManager. wicd is ok. I've had decent luck with it, The thing is, I'm kind of a minimalist. and I don't get around that much. A couple local coffee shops and work thats about it. I'm thinking with enough persistance I can come up with something that works without wicd.
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Hu
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 10, 2013 1:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If your interface devices are fixed, you can create the symlinks as NeddySeagoon says, but not add them to the init system. If they are not added via rc-update, they will not autostart, but root can still start them by hand. This is the ultimate in minimalism, since it means you must manually start/stop the interfaces.
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mreff555
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 10, 2013 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yep, that's what I am doing now. I've always kept my Ethernet device manual because I rarely use it.

Now as far as the wpa_supplicant.conf file is concerned. I have noticed that there is an option to specify priorities.
This would leave me to believe that you can have multiple entries in the file.

Lets say I routinely took my laptop between my home, work, and a coffee shop. Can I generate the PSK for all three and stick them in the conf file?
what does it do if it cannot find one of the essid's in the file? Does it generate an error or move on to the next one?
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DONAHUE
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 10, 2013 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

moves on
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depontius
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 11, 2013 1:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mreff555 wrote:

Lets say I routinely took my laptop between my home, work, and a coffee shop. Can I generate the PSK for all three and stick them in the conf file?
what does it do if it cannot find one of the essid's in the file? Does it generate an error or move on to the next one?


I'm set up this way. You can have it connect to whatever it will find that is in the conf file, either automatically or manually. Beyond that you can activate the GUI and run the scanner to manually connect to some other AP.
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TomWij
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For reference, see https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Udev/upgrade and http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/systemd/PredictableNetworkInterfaceNames
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