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psdasilva
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 11:52 pm    Post subject: Help on a new laptop Reply with quote

I have two computers with gentoo for 9 and 6 years respectively.
I should be an expert on gentoo. Unfortunately I am not. Everything run so smoothly that I never needed a new installation! Thank you gentoo guys.

Now the problems ...
I am bout to receive a brand new laptop an d I don't know I to begin to put gentoo on it.

1. What about dual boot with windows 8 and other "modern" stuff (partitions, UEFI, "secure" boot)?
I found a doc in the wiki bu it uses rEFInd. Does it work? Any solution with grub or grub2 (I would prefer one of these)?

2. What about two graphics? In this case the one that is in the Intel Core i7-4700MQ CPU and a NVIDIA GeForce GT 740M? How to handle them? Last nvidia-drivers is enough? Any other programs?

3. I heard of problems making subwofers to work - Beats Audio with 4 speakers and two Subwoofers.
Anything on this?

I would like to hear from you, who may have had some experience with these issues, before I run into problems.
Any suggestions or links to pertinent docs are welcome.

Thank you very much for any help or comments.
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Hu
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2014 2:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For UEFI systems, I like using efibootmgr in conjunction with the EFI stub support in the kernel to register the kernel as its own bootloader.
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cwr
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2014 2:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Find out if it's possible to use EasyBCD, or another utility, to edit your windows
boot menu. (I don't know if EasyBCD will work with current Windows setups;
it worked with Windows 7). That slows the boot process by five or ten seconds,
but avoids messing with the Windows partitions (apart from shrinking one of them).
Windows especially doesn't like its recovery partition being messed with.

The Windows boot menu then boots a (Grub) boot partition, which in turn loads
Linux; again, a separate boot partition of 128MB or so makes life easier, since you
only have to configure the Windows menu once. Messing with the boot sequence
always makes me nervous.

Will
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psdasilva
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 7:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cwr:

Let me see if I understood ...

1. Check if easyBCD works with the windows (hope to find some doc).
2. Create a partition where to put the /boot contents (ex. /dev/sdax).
3. grub-install /dev/sdax.
4. Configure windows to boot also /dev/sdax.

I suppose I also need to turn off secure boot.

Is this OK?
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cwr
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 11:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

psdasilva wrote:
cwr:

Let me see if I understood ...

1. Check if easyBCD works with the windows (hope to find some doc).
2. Create a partition where to put the /boot contents (ex. /dev/sdax).
3. grub-install /dev/sdax.
4. Configure windows to boot also /dev/sdax.

I suppose I also need to turn off secure boot.

Is this OK?


I've mercifully never had to deal with secure boot, but I _think_ there are ways to boot Linux without
turning it off, though you may have to jump through hoops. Ask on the Forums before making a decision
(I'd keep it if possible).

My current laptop has the partitions:
Code:

# T61 hard drive (planar).
#/dev/sda1: Windows 7 Home Premium recovery partition.
#/dev/sda2      /media/seven   ntfs      noauto,ro   0 0
/dev/sda5      /media/msdos   vfat      noauto      0 0
/dev/sda6      /boot      ext2      noauto,noatime   1 2
/dev/sda7      none      swap      sw      0 0
/dev/sda8      /      ext4      noatime,nobarrier 0 1
/dev/sda9      /home      ext4      noatime,nobarrier 0 2
/dev/sda10      /var      ext4      noatime,nobarrier 0 2
/dev/sda11      /usr/portage   ext4      noatime,nobarrier 0 2


That's more than you need - a separate boot, / and /home is really all that's necessary. I just
find the extra partitions convenient; you certainly don't need the vfat partition, which is there
only because I don't trust the ntfs driver for writing.

Windows knows nothing about the partitions greater than 6. The Windows menu boots grub
on sda6, and grub takes it from there. The advantage of a separate boot partition is that once
it's set up you can ignore it, whatever rebuilding/reinstalling you do (this system also boots
Ubuntu from the grub menu on a partition I haven't shown). The only change you have to
make is to edit the grub.conf file, or its equivalent in grub 2.

Good luck - Will
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DONAHUE
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the easy way: http://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/UEFI_Dual_boot_with_Windows_7/8
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